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Ten year follow-up of pyrocarbon implants for proximal interphalangeal joint replacement


Reissner, L; Schindele, S; Hensler, S; Marks, M; Herren, D B (2014). Ten year follow-up of pyrocarbon implants for proximal interphalangeal joint replacement. Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, 39(6):582-586.

Abstract

Results of anatomical resurfacing of the proximal interphalangeal joint using pyrocarbon implants showed reasonable clinical results with a high radiographic migration rate. The aim was to investigate the subjective, clinical, and radiographic results 10 years following surgery, and to compare them with our 2-year follow-up data. We re-evaluated 12 patients with 15 proximal interphalangeal implants on average 9.7 years after surgery. Pain significantly improved from 7.6 on a visual analogue scale pre-operatively to 1.4 at 2 years, and to 0.7 at the final follow-up. The mean total range of motion in all replaced joints was 36° pre-operatively and 39° at the 2-year follow-up, but had decreased significantly to 29° at 10 years. We saw one implant migration in addition to the eight migrated implants we already found 2 years after surgery. The moderate clinical results, combined with the high migration rate, mean that we no longer use this kind of implant.

Abstract

Results of anatomical resurfacing of the proximal interphalangeal joint using pyrocarbon implants showed reasonable clinical results with a high radiographic migration rate. The aim was to investigate the subjective, clinical, and radiographic results 10 years following surgery, and to compare them with our 2-year follow-up data. We re-evaluated 12 patients with 15 proximal interphalangeal implants on average 9.7 years after surgery. Pain significantly improved from 7.6 on a visual analogue scale pre-operatively to 1.4 at 2 years, and to 0.7 at the final follow-up. The mean total range of motion in all replaced joints was 36° pre-operatively and 39° at the 2-year follow-up, but had decreased significantly to 29° at 10 years. We saw one implant migration in addition to the eight migrated implants we already found 2 years after surgery. The moderate clinical results, combined with the high migration rate, mean that we no longer use this kind of implant.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:23 January 2014
Deposited On:04 Nov 2014 08:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:27
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0266-7681
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1753193413511922
PubMed ID:24459251

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