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Influence of general self-efficacy on the effects of a school-based universal primary prevention program of depressive symptoms in adolescents: a randomized and controlled follow-up study


Pössel, Patrick; Baldus, Christiane; Horn, Andrea B; Groen, Gunter; Hautzinger, Martin (2005). Influence of general self-efficacy on the effects of a school-based universal primary prevention program of depressive symptoms in adolescents: a randomized and controlled follow-up study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46(9):982-994.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Depressive disorders in adolescents are a widespread and increasing problem. Prevention seems a promising and feasible approach. METHODS: We designed a cognitive-behavioral school-based universal primary prevention program and followed 347 eighth-grade students participating in a randomized controlled trial for three months. RESULTS: In line with our hypothesis, participants in the prevention program remained on a low level of depressive symptoms, having strong social networks. The control group showed increasing depressive symptoms and a reduced social network. Contrary to our expectations, students low in self-efficacy benefited more from the program than high self-efficient students. Social network did not mediate the relationship between participation in the prevention program and changes in depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the prevention program had favorable effects. Further research is needed to explore the impact of self-efficacy on the effects of prevention programs.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Depressive disorders in adolescents are a widespread and increasing problem. Prevention seems a promising and feasible approach. METHODS: We designed a cognitive-behavioral school-based universal primary prevention program and followed 347 eighth-grade students participating in a randomized controlled trial for three months. RESULTS: In line with our hypothesis, participants in the prevention program remained on a low level of depressive symptoms, having strong social networks. The control group showed increasing depressive symptoms and a reduced social network. Contrary to our expectations, students low in self-efficacy benefited more from the program than high self-efficient students. Social network did not mediate the relationship between participation in the prevention program and changes in depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the prevention program had favorable effects. Further research is needed to explore the impact of self-efficacy on the effects of prevention programs.

Citations

34 citations in Web of Science®
48 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:31 Oct 2014 15:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0021-9630
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00395.x
PubMed ID:16109001

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