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Does money illusion matter?: Reply


Fehr, Ernst; Tyran, Jean-Robert (2014). Does money illusion matter?: Reply. American Economic Review, 104(3):1063-1071.

Abstract

The data in Fehr and Tyran (FT, 2001) and Luba Petersen and Abel Winn (PW,2013) show that money illusion plays an important role in nominal price adjustment after a fully anticipated negative monetary shock. Money Illusion affects subjects' expectations, and causes pronounced nominal inertia after a negative shock but much less inertia after a positive shock. Thus PW provide a misleading interpretation both of our and their own data.

Abstract

The data in Fehr and Tyran (FT, 2001) and Luba Petersen and Abel Winn (PW,2013) show that money illusion plays an important role in nominal price adjustment after a fully anticipated negative monetary shock. Money Illusion affects subjects' expectations, and causes pronounced nominal inertia after a negative shock but much less inertia after a positive shock. Thus PW provide a misleading interpretation both of our and their own data.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:March 2014
Deposited On:03 Nov 2014 08:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:28
Publisher:American Economic Association
ISSN:0002-8282
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.104.3.1063

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