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Hydrocephalus after resection and adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma


Fischer, Claudia M; Neidert, Marian C; Péus, Dominik; Ulrich, Nils H; Regli, Luca; Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Woernle, Christoph M (2014). Hydrocephalus after resection and adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma. Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, 120:27-31.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Glioblastomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with a poor prognosis. The current study sought to identify risk factors in glioblastoma patients that are closely associated with communicating hydrocephalus.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed data from 151 patients who were diagnosed with a glioblastoma between 2007 and 2011 and underwent complete surgical resection closely followed by adjuvant radiochemotherapy.
RESULTS: We observed a significant tendency toward communicating hydrocephalus in cases of ventricular opening during surgical tumor resection (Fisher's exact test p<0.001) and a noticeable, although not statistically significant, correlation between the onset of communicating hydrocephalus and evidence of leptomeningeal tumor dissemination (Fisher's exact test p=0.067). Additionally, there was a trend toward frontal tumor location and a larger tumor volume in patients with communicating hydrocephalus. The majority of patients suffering from communicating hydrocephalus received a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt implantation after radiation therapy (63.6%, Fisher's exact test p=0.000).
CONCLUSION: We identified the following risk factors associated with the onset of communicating hydrocephalus in glioblastoma patients: ventricular opening during tumor resection and leptomeningeal tumor dissemination. Shunt implantation seems to be safe and effective in these patients.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Glioblastomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with a poor prognosis. The current study sought to identify risk factors in glioblastoma patients that are closely associated with communicating hydrocephalus.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed data from 151 patients who were diagnosed with a glioblastoma between 2007 and 2011 and underwent complete surgical resection closely followed by adjuvant radiochemotherapy.
RESULTS: We observed a significant tendency toward communicating hydrocephalus in cases of ventricular opening during surgical tumor resection (Fisher's exact test p<0.001) and a noticeable, although not statistically significant, correlation between the onset of communicating hydrocephalus and evidence of leptomeningeal tumor dissemination (Fisher's exact test p=0.067). Additionally, there was a trend toward frontal tumor location and a larger tumor volume in patients with communicating hydrocephalus. The majority of patients suffering from communicating hydrocephalus received a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt implantation after radiation therapy (63.6%, Fisher's exact test p=0.000).
CONCLUSION: We identified the following risk factors associated with the onset of communicating hydrocephalus in glioblastoma patients: ventricular opening during tumor resection and leptomeningeal tumor dissemination. Shunt implantation seems to be safe and effective in these patients.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2014
Deposited On:11 Feb 2015 09:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0303-8467
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2014.02.012
PubMed ID:24731571

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