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Single motor unit responses underlying cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials produced by bone-conducted stimuli


Rosengren, S M; Colebatch, J G; Straumann, D; Weber, K P (2015). Single motor unit responses underlying cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials produced by bone-conducted stimuli. Clinical Neurophysiology, 126(6):1234-1245.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) are muscle reflexes recorded from the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) neck muscles following vestibular activation with air- or bone-conducted (BC) stimulation. We investigated the effect of different forms of BC stimulation on the single motor unit response underlying the cVEMP.
METHODS: We tested 8 healthy human subjects with 5 different stimuli. Motor units were recorded with thin concentric needle electrodes; surface potentials were recorded simultaneously.
RESULTS: The polarity of the initial change (at approx. 15ms) in single motor unit activity reflected the polarity of the surface cVEMPs: a short-latency decrease in activity (inhibition) was seen with the four stimuli that produced a positive surface potential (p13), while an initial increase in activity (excitation) was seen with the stimulus that produced a negative surface potential.
CONCLUSIONS: BC stimulation with common clinical stimuli usually produces an inhibition in single motor unit activity in the ipsilateral SCM muscle. However the projections activated by BC stimulation are not exclusively inhibitory in nature and depend upon the shape and direction of the stimulus.
SIGNIFICANCE: The utricle is likely to contribute to some BC cVEMPs, as some stimuli clearly evoke an excitation that is not likely to be saccular in origin.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) are muscle reflexes recorded from the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) neck muscles following vestibular activation with air- or bone-conducted (BC) stimulation. We investigated the effect of different forms of BC stimulation on the single motor unit response underlying the cVEMP.
METHODS: We tested 8 healthy human subjects with 5 different stimuli. Motor units were recorded with thin concentric needle electrodes; surface potentials were recorded simultaneously.
RESULTS: The polarity of the initial change (at approx. 15ms) in single motor unit activity reflected the polarity of the surface cVEMPs: a short-latency decrease in activity (inhibition) was seen with the four stimuli that produced a positive surface potential (p13), while an initial increase in activity (excitation) was seen with the stimulus that produced a negative surface potential.
CONCLUSIONS: BC stimulation with common clinical stimuli usually produces an inhibition in single motor unit activity in the ipsilateral SCM muscle. However the projections activated by BC stimulation are not exclusively inhibitory in nature and depend upon the shape and direction of the stimulus.
SIGNIFICANCE: The utricle is likely to contribute to some BC cVEMPs, as some stimuli clearly evoke an excitation that is not likely to be saccular in origin.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:06 Nov 2014 09:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2014.07.037
PubMed ID:25304175

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