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A Steric-inhibition model for regulation of nucleotide exchange via the Dock180 family of GEFs.


Lu, M; Kinchen, J M; Rossman, K L; Grimsley, C M; Hall, M; Sondek, J; Hengartner, M O; Yajnik, V; Ravichandran, K S (2005). A Steric-inhibition model for regulation of nucleotide exchange via the Dock180 family of GEFs. Current Biology, 15(4):371-377.

Abstract

CDM (CED-5, Dock180, Myoblast city) family members have been recently identified as novel, evolutionarily conserved guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho-family GTPases . They regulate multiple processes, including embryonic development, cell migration, apoptotic-cell engulfment, tumor invasion, and HIV-1 infection, in diverse model systems . However, the mechanism(s) of regulation of CDM proteins has not been well understood. Here, our studies on the prototype member Dock180 reveal a steric-inhibition model for regulating the Dock180 family of GEFs. At basal state, the N-terminal SH3 domain of Dock180 binds to the distant catalytic Docker domain and negatively regulates the function of Dock180. Further studies revealed that the SH3:Docker interaction sterically blocks Rac access to the Docker domain. Interestingly, ELMO binding to the SH3 domain of Dock180 disrupted the SH3:Docker interaction, facilitated Rac access to the Docker domain, and contributed to the GEF activity of the Dock180/ELMO complex. Additional genetic rescue studies in C. elegans suggested that the regulation of the Docker-domain-mediated GEF activity by the SH3 domain and its adjoining region is evolutionarily conserved. This steric-inhibition model may be a general mechanism for regulating multiple SH3-domain-containing Dock180 family members and may have implications for a variety of biological processes.

Abstract

CDM (CED-5, Dock180, Myoblast city) family members have been recently identified as novel, evolutionarily conserved guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho-family GTPases . They regulate multiple processes, including embryonic development, cell migration, apoptotic-cell engulfment, tumor invasion, and HIV-1 infection, in diverse model systems . However, the mechanism(s) of regulation of CDM proteins has not been well understood. Here, our studies on the prototype member Dock180 reveal a steric-inhibition model for regulating the Dock180 family of GEFs. At basal state, the N-terminal SH3 domain of Dock180 binds to the distant catalytic Docker domain and negatively regulates the function of Dock180. Further studies revealed that the SH3:Docker interaction sterically blocks Rac access to the Docker domain. Interestingly, ELMO binding to the SH3 domain of Dock180 disrupted the SH3:Docker interaction, facilitated Rac access to the Docker domain, and contributed to the GEF activity of the Dock180/ELMO complex. Additional genetic rescue studies in C. elegans suggested that the regulation of the Docker-domain-mediated GEF activity by the SH3 domain and its adjoining region is evolutionarily conserved. This steric-inhibition model may be a general mechanism for regulating multiple SH3-domain-containing Dock180 family members and may have implications for a variety of biological processes.

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64 citations in Web of Science®
70 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:22 February 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0960-9822
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2005.01.050
PubMed ID:15723800

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