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Do humans show velocity-storage in the vertical rVOR?


Bertolini, G; Bockisch, C J; Straumann, D; Zee, D S; Ramat, S (2008). Do humans show velocity-storage in the vertical rVOR? Progress in Brain Research, 171:207-210.

Abstract

To investigate the contribution of the vestibular velocity-storage mechanism (VSM) to the vertical rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (rVOR) we recorded eye movements evoked by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) using whole-body constant-velocity pitch rotations about an earth-horizontal, interaural axis in four healthy human subjects. Subjects were tumbled forward, and backward, at 60 deg/s for over 1 min using a 3D turntable. Slow-phase velocity (SPV) responses were similar to the horizontal responses elicited by OVAR along the body longitudinal axis, ('barbecue' rotation), with exponentially decaying amplitudes and a residual, otolith-driven sinusoidal response with a bias. The time constants of the vertical SPV ranged from 6 to 9 s. These values are closer to those that reflect the dynamic properties of vestibular afferents than the typical 20 s produced by the VSM in the horizontal plane, confirming the relatively smaller contribution of the VSM to these vertical responses. Our preliminary results also agree with the idea that the VSM velocity response aligns with the direction of gravity. The horizontal and torsional eye velocity traces were also sinusoidally modulated by the change in gravity, but showed no exponential decay.

Abstract

To investigate the contribution of the vestibular velocity-storage mechanism (VSM) to the vertical rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (rVOR) we recorded eye movements evoked by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) using whole-body constant-velocity pitch rotations about an earth-horizontal, interaural axis in four healthy human subjects. Subjects were tumbled forward, and backward, at 60 deg/s for over 1 min using a 3D turntable. Slow-phase velocity (SPV) responses were similar to the horizontal responses elicited by OVAR along the body longitudinal axis, ('barbecue' rotation), with exponentially decaying amplitudes and a residual, otolith-driven sinusoidal response with a bias. The time constants of the vertical SPV ranged from 6 to 9 s. These values are closer to those that reflect the dynamic properties of vestibular afferents than the typical 20 s produced by the VSM in the horizontal plane, confirming the relatively smaller contribution of the VSM to these vertical responses. Our preliminary results also agree with the idea that the VSM velocity response aligns with the direction of gravity. The horizontal and torsional eye velocity traces were also sinusoidally modulated by the change in gravity, but showed no exponential decay.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:13 Jan 2009 10:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0079-6123
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0079-6123(08)00628-6
PubMed ID:18718302

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