UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Effect of Mineralocorticoids on Acid-Base Balance


Wagner, Carsten A (2014). Effect of Mineralocorticoids on Acid-Base Balance. Nephron Physiology, 128(1-2):26-34.

Abstract

Aldosterone is classically associated with the regulation of salt and potassium homeostasis but has also profound effects on acid-base balance. During acidosis, circulating aldosterone levels are increased and the hormone acts in concert with angiotensin II and other factors to stimulate renal acid excretion. Pharmacological blockade of aldosterone action as well as inherited or acquired syndromes of impaired aldosterone release or action impair the renal response to acid loading and cause hyperkalemic renal tubular acidosis. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediating the genomic effects of aldosterone is expressed in all cells of the distal nephron including all subtypes of intercalated cells. In acid-secretory type A intercalated cells, aldosterone stimulates proton secretion into urine, whereas in non-type A intercalated cells, aldosterone increases the activity of the luminal anion exchanger pendrin stimulating bicarbonate secretion and chloride reabsorption. Aldosterone has also stimulatory effects on proton secretion that may be mediated by a non-genomic pathway. In addition, aldosterone indirectly stimulates renal acid excretion by enhancing sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. Increased sodium reabsorption enhances the lumen-negative transepithelial voltage that facilitates proton secretion by neighboring intercalated cells. This indirect coupling of sodium reabsorption and proton secretion is thought to underlie the fludrocortisone-furosemide test for maximal urinary acidification in patients with suspected distal renal tubular acidosis. In patients with CKD, acidosis-induced aldosterone may contribute to progression of kidney disease. In summary, aldosterone is a powerful regulator of renal acid excretion required for normal acid-base balance. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Aldosterone is classically associated with the regulation of salt and potassium homeostasis but has also profound effects on acid-base balance. During acidosis, circulating aldosterone levels are increased and the hormone acts in concert with angiotensin II and other factors to stimulate renal acid excretion. Pharmacological blockade of aldosterone action as well as inherited or acquired syndromes of impaired aldosterone release or action impair the renal response to acid loading and cause hyperkalemic renal tubular acidosis. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediating the genomic effects of aldosterone is expressed in all cells of the distal nephron including all subtypes of intercalated cells. In acid-secretory type A intercalated cells, aldosterone stimulates proton secretion into urine, whereas in non-type A intercalated cells, aldosterone increases the activity of the luminal anion exchanger pendrin stimulating bicarbonate secretion and chloride reabsorption. Aldosterone has also stimulatory effects on proton secretion that may be mediated by a non-genomic pathway. In addition, aldosterone indirectly stimulates renal acid excretion by enhancing sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. Increased sodium reabsorption enhances the lumen-negative transepithelial voltage that facilitates proton secretion by neighboring intercalated cells. This indirect coupling of sodium reabsorption and proton secretion is thought to underlie the fludrocortisone-furosemide test for maximal urinary acidification in patients with suspected distal renal tubular acidosis. In patients with CKD, acidosis-induced aldosterone may contribute to progression of kidney disease. In summary, aldosterone is a powerful regulator of renal acid excretion required for normal acid-base balance. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

75 downloads since deposited on 26 Nov 2014
47 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:6 November 2014
Deposited On:26 Nov 2014 08:17
Last Modified:27 May 2016 12:59
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1660-2137
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000368266
PubMed ID:25377117
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-101137

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 200kB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations