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Dyadic longitudinal interplay between personality and relationship satisfaction: A focus on neuroticism and self-esteem


Schaffhuser, Kathrin; Wagner, Jenny; Lüdtke, Oliver; Allemand, Mathias (2014). Dyadic longitudinal interplay between personality and relationship satisfaction: A focus on neuroticism and self-esteem. Journal of Research in Personality, 53:124-133.

Abstract

The current study investigated the dyadic longitudinal interplay between neuroticism, self-esteem, and individual and shared aspects of relationship satisfaction in intimate partners. The study involved data of 141 heterosexual couples with a broad age range measured at two measurement occasions spaced 2 years apart. The analyses were based on Actor–Partner Interdependence Models and extended Common Fate Models. Regarding individual relationship satisfaction, neuroticism was found to be a predictor at the intrapersonal level, whereas self-esteem turned out to be an interpersonal outcome. Furthermore, shared relationship satisfaction predicted self-esteem 2 years later. The findings contribute to the literature by showing that relationship satisfaction can be both outcome and predictor depending on the personality trait and the model applied for dyadic data analysis.

The current study investigated the dyadic longitudinal interplay between neuroticism, self-esteem, and individual and shared aspects of relationship satisfaction in intimate partners. The study involved data of 141 heterosexual couples with a broad age range measured at two measurement occasions spaced 2 years apart. The analyses were based on Actor–Partner Interdependence Models and extended Common Fate Models. Regarding individual relationship satisfaction, neuroticism was found to be a predictor at the intrapersonal level, whereas self-esteem turned out to be an interpersonal outcome. Furthermore, shared relationship satisfaction predicted self-esteem 2 years later. The findings contribute to the literature by showing that relationship satisfaction can be both outcome and predictor depending on the personality trait and the model applied for dyadic data analysis.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPSYCH Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:27 Nov 2014 10:32
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:33
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0092-6566
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2014.08.007

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