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Vitamin D status among children and adolescents on anticonvulsant drugs in Southern Switzerland


Ramelli, V; Ramelli, G P; Lava, S A G; Siegenthaler, G M; Bianchetti, M G; Ceschi, A (2014). Vitamin D status among children and adolescents on anticonvulsant drugs in Southern Switzerland. Swiss Medical Weekly, 144(144):w13996.

Abstract

Introduction It is recognized that vitamin D status is often inadequate (<50 nmol/L) in epileptic children, mainly because some anticonvulsant drugs induce the enzymes responsible for its metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to address vitamin D status among children and adolescents treated with anticonvulsant drugs and control subjects who reside in Southern Switzerland, a high solar radiation region.
Methods Between January and May 2013, total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was assessed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 58 children and adolescents with epilepsy and 29 controls residing in Southern Switzerland. Dark-skinned individuals, females wearing dress styles covering practically the whole body and subjects with body mass index ≥85th percentile for age and sex were excluded.
Results Concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was similar in epilepsy patients (48 [37-62] nmol/L; median and interquartile range) and controls (53 [47-64] nmol/L). An inadequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was common both among patients (55%) and control subjects (34%). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly lower among patients treated with anticonvulsant drugs that induce the metabolism of vitamin D (30 [21-51] nmol/L) than among the remaining patients (51 [40-65] nmol/L) and controls.
Conclusions The present study indicates a relevant tendency towards inadequate vitamin D status among children with and without anticonvulsant drug management who reside in Southern Switzerland. This tendency is more prominent in patients treated with anticonvulsant drugs that induce the metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

Introduction It is recognized that vitamin D status is often inadequate (<50 nmol/L) in epileptic children, mainly because some anticonvulsant drugs induce the enzymes responsible for its metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to address vitamin D status among children and adolescents treated with anticonvulsant drugs and control subjects who reside in Southern Switzerland, a high solar radiation region.
Methods Between January and May 2013, total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was assessed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 58 children and adolescents with epilepsy and 29 controls residing in Southern Switzerland. Dark-skinned individuals, females wearing dress styles covering practically the whole body and subjects with body mass index ≥85th percentile for age and sex were excluded.
Results Concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was similar in epilepsy patients (48 [37-62] nmol/L; median and interquartile range) and controls (53 [47-64] nmol/L). An inadequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was common both among patients (55%) and control subjects (34%). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly lower among patients treated with anticonvulsant drugs that induce the metabolism of vitamin D (30 [21-51] nmol/L) than among the remaining patients (51 [40-65] nmol/L) and controls.
Conclusions The present study indicates a relevant tendency towards inadequate vitamin D status among children with and without anticonvulsant drug management who reside in Southern Switzerland. This tendency is more prominent in patients treated with anticonvulsant drugs that induce the metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:13 August 2014
Deposited On:28 Nov 2014 10:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:33
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2014.13996
PubMed ID:25118788
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-101397

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