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Serum procalcitonin for discrimination between septic and non-septic arthritis


Hügle, T; Schuetz, P; Mueller, B; Laifer, G; Tyndall, A; Regenass, S; Daikeler, T (2008). Serum procalcitonin for discrimination between septic and non-septic arthritis. Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, 26(3):453-456.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early differentiation between septic and non-septic arthritis is difficult. A previous study showed promising diagnostic accuracy of serum Procalcitonin (PCT) in septic arthritis, limited by a low sensitive PCT test kit. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of PCT in patients with septic and non-septic arthritis using a novel test with low detection limit. METHODS: Forty-two patients, 28 with non-septic and 14 with septic arthritis were prospectively included. For each patient, gram stain, culture and polarization microscopy of synovial fluid was done and PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count, uric acid and blood cultures were taken. Patients with septic arthritis, patients with non-septic arthritis with and without concomitant infection were compared. RESULTS: Patients with septic arthritis had a significant higher PCT concentration than patients with non-septic arthritis (p<0.0001). At a cut-off of 0.1 (0.25) ng/ml, sensitivity for septic arthritis was 100(93)% and specificity 46(75)%. Specificity rose to 93% after exclusion of patients with non-septic arthritis and concomitant infection. Both sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of septic arthritis were higher for PCT than CRP. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that PCT seems to be a highly sensitive and specific marker for septic arthritis, depending on the clinical setting. Further studies are warranted.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early differentiation between septic and non-septic arthritis is difficult. A previous study showed promising diagnostic accuracy of serum Procalcitonin (PCT) in septic arthritis, limited by a low sensitive PCT test kit. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of PCT in patients with septic and non-septic arthritis using a novel test with low detection limit. METHODS: Forty-two patients, 28 with non-septic and 14 with septic arthritis were prospectively included. For each patient, gram stain, culture and polarization microscopy of synovial fluid was done and PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count, uric acid and blood cultures were taken. Patients with septic arthritis, patients with non-septic arthritis with and without concomitant infection were compared. RESULTS: Patients with septic arthritis had a significant higher PCT concentration than patients with non-septic arthritis (p<0.0001). At a cut-off of 0.1 (0.25) ng/ml, sensitivity for septic arthritis was 100(93)% and specificity 46(75)%. Specificity rose to 93% after exclusion of patients with non-septic arthritis and concomitant infection. Both sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of septic arthritis were higher for PCT than CRP. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that PCT seems to be a highly sensitive and specific marker for septic arthritis, depending on the clinical setting. Further studies are warranted.

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41 citations in Web of Science®
51 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:21 Jan 2009 10:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:49
Publisher:Clinical And Experimental Rheumatology S.A.S.
ISSN:0392-856X
PubMed ID:18578968

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