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MR imaging relaxometry allows noninvasive characterization of in vivo differentiation of muscle precursor cells


Chuck, Natalie C; Azzabi Zouraq, Fahd; Rottmar, Markus; Eberli, Daniel; Boss, Andreas (2015). MR imaging relaxometry allows noninvasive characterization of in vivo differentiation of muscle precursor cells. Radiology, 274(3):800-809.

Abstract

Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo monitoring of the myogenic differentiation process from human muscle precursor cells to mature skeletal muscle tissue by measuring characteristic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging relaxation and diffusion properties as a potential noninvasive diagnostic tool in muscle cell therapy. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the ethics committee for studies in humans and the animal care committee. The hypothesis was tested by means of subcutaneous injection of human muscle precursor cells from the rectus abdominis muscle into nude mice (n = 18). Animals injected with human fibroblasts, prostate cancer cells, or collagen served as control animals (four in each group). T1, T2, T2*, and apparent diffusion coefficients ( ADC apparent diffusion coefficient s) were measured at 4.7-T MR imaging. MR imaging parameters were statistically evaluated by using analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. The engineered muscle was characterized by means of immunofluorescence, Western blot, and contraction assays. Results Muscle tissue in the early stages of the differentiation process exhibited distinctly higher T1 (mean ± standard deviation, 2242 msec ± 116), T2 (224 msec ± 18), and T2* (33.3 msec ± 3.6) values and ADC apparent diffusion coefficient s (1.53 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec ± 0.03) compared with those of skeletal muscle. The muscle precursor cells exhibited a nonspecific pattern compared with that in control animals in the early stages. During differentiation, the relaxation and diffusion parameters decreased and approached the values for mature skeletal muscle tissue: T1, 1386 msec ± 88; T2, 32.0 msec ± 4.3; T2*, 10.8 msec ± 0.8; ADC apparent diffusion coefficient , 1.39 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec ± 0.02 (reference erector spinae muscle tissue: T1, 1417 msec ± 106; T2, 31.0 msec ± 2.4; T2*, 11.3 msec ± 1.7; and ADC apparent diffusion coefficient , 1.40 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec ± 0.03). Conclusion MR imaging relaxation and diffusion measurements can be used as potential biomarkers for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the myogenic differentiation process from muscle precursor cells to mature skeletal muscle tissue in muscle cell therapy. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo monitoring of the myogenic differentiation process from human muscle precursor cells to mature skeletal muscle tissue by measuring characteristic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging relaxation and diffusion properties as a potential noninvasive diagnostic tool in muscle cell therapy. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the ethics committee for studies in humans and the animal care committee. The hypothesis was tested by means of subcutaneous injection of human muscle precursor cells from the rectus abdominis muscle into nude mice (n = 18). Animals injected with human fibroblasts, prostate cancer cells, or collagen served as control animals (four in each group). T1, T2, T2*, and apparent diffusion coefficients ( ADC apparent diffusion coefficient s) were measured at 4.7-T MR imaging. MR imaging parameters were statistically evaluated by using analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. The engineered muscle was characterized by means of immunofluorescence, Western blot, and contraction assays. Results Muscle tissue in the early stages of the differentiation process exhibited distinctly higher T1 (mean ± standard deviation, 2242 msec ± 116), T2 (224 msec ± 18), and T2* (33.3 msec ± 3.6) values and ADC apparent diffusion coefficient s (1.53 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec ± 0.03) compared with those of skeletal muscle. The muscle precursor cells exhibited a nonspecific pattern compared with that in control animals in the early stages. During differentiation, the relaxation and diffusion parameters decreased and approached the values for mature skeletal muscle tissue: T1, 1386 msec ± 88; T2, 32.0 msec ± 4.3; T2*, 10.8 msec ± 0.8; ADC apparent diffusion coefficient , 1.39 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec ± 0.02 (reference erector spinae muscle tissue: T1, 1417 msec ± 106; T2, 31.0 msec ± 2.4; T2*, 11.3 msec ± 1.7; and ADC apparent diffusion coefficient , 1.40 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec ± 0.03). Conclusion MR imaging relaxation and diffusion measurements can be used as potential biomarkers for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the myogenic differentiation process from muscle precursor cells to mature skeletal muscle tissue in muscle cell therapy. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:09 Dec 2014 14:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:35
Publisher:Radiological Society of North America
ISSN:0033-8419
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.14140483
PubMed ID:25423144

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