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Dermoscopic evaluation of skin in healthy cats


Zanna, G; Auriemma, E; Arrighi, S; Attanasi, A; Zini, E; Scarampella, F (2015). Dermoscopic evaluation of skin in healthy cats. Veterinary Dermatology, 26(1):14-e4.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dermoscopy is a diagnostic tool that can reveal morphological structures not visible upon clinical examination.
HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To assess the usefulness and applicability of dermoscopy for the examination of healthy cat skin.
ANIMALS: Twenty-one domestic short-haired cats from a feline rescue association.
METHODS: Four regions (head, dorsal neck, sacral and abdominal regions) were examined with both a contact hand-held nonpolarized light dermoscope at 10-fold magnification and a videodermoscope at 70-fold magnification. Findings were assessed using histological analysis of skin samples cut both longitudinally and transversely, set as the gold standard.
RESULTS: With a hand-held dermoscope at 10-fold magnification, thick, straight primary hairs surrounded by multiple secondary hairs were observed. With a videodermoscope at 70-fold magnification, hair shaft thickness was measured and the follicular openings and arrangement of vessels were clearly observed. Correspondence was observed between dermoscopic and histological results.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Dermoscopy represents a valid noninvasive and reproducible technique that could be helpful in clinical examination.

BACKGROUND: Dermoscopy is a diagnostic tool that can reveal morphological structures not visible upon clinical examination.
HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To assess the usefulness and applicability of dermoscopy for the examination of healthy cat skin.
ANIMALS: Twenty-one domestic short-haired cats from a feline rescue association.
METHODS: Four regions (head, dorsal neck, sacral and abdominal regions) were examined with both a contact hand-held nonpolarized light dermoscope at 10-fold magnification and a videodermoscope at 70-fold magnification. Findings were assessed using histological analysis of skin samples cut both longitudinally and transversely, set as the gold standard.
RESULTS: With a hand-held dermoscope at 10-fold magnification, thick, straight primary hairs surrounded by multiple secondary hairs were observed. With a videodermoscope at 70-fold magnification, hair shaft thickness was measured and the follicular openings and arrangement of vessels were clearly observed. Correspondence was observed between dermoscopic and histological results.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Dermoscopy represents a valid noninvasive and reproducible technique that could be helpful in clinical examination.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:February 2015
Deposited On:30 Dec 2014 14:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:39
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0959-4493
Additional Information:This is the accepted version of the following article: [Zanna, G., Auriemma, E., Arrighi, S., Attanasi, A., Zini, E. and Scarampella, F. (2014), Dermoscopic evaluation of skin in healthy cats. Veterinary Dermatology. doi: 10.1111/vde.12179], which has been published in final form at [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12179]
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vde.12179
PubMed ID:25354768
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-102787

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