UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Listeners may rely on intonation to distinguish languages of different rhythm classes


Hagmann, Lea; Dellwo, Volker (2014). Listeners may rely on intonation to distinguish languages of different rhythm classes. Loquens, 1(1):e008.

Abstract

Previous research argued that listeners can distinguish between languages of different rhythm class but not of the same class (class discrimination hypothesis). In the present research we tested the role of duration and pitch cues (intonation) in this process. In Experiment I we tested whether we could replicate previous findings on listeners’ language discrimination ability with native Swiss German listeners. Results showed that the discrimination of English and Japanese based on durational cues led to the same results as in previous experiments. In Experiment II we tested listeners’ ability to distinguish between languages belonging to different rhythm classes (English-French, French-Japanese, Spanish-Japanese) and the same rhythm class (Spanish-French). Results revealed that listeners’ distinction was not above chance level for all language contrasts. In Experiment III we added intonation to a French-English and a Spanish-French language contrast. Results revealed a significant effect of intonation for the French-English but not the Spanish-French contrast. The experiments showed that the primary cue for listeners to distinguish between languages of different rhythm class is not generally duration, as previously hypothesized, but it can also be intonation. Implications of the findings on the theory that languages can be classified according to their speech rhythm (rhythm class hypothesis) are discussed.

Los oyentes podrían basarse en la entonación para distinguir lenguas de diferentes clases rítmicas.-Algunas investigaciones anteriores sostienen que los oyentes pueden distinguir entre lenguas de diferente ritmo pero, en cambio, no de la misma clase rítmica (hipótesis de la discriminación de clases). En la presente investigación examinamos el papel de la duración y de las claves tonales (entonación) en este proceso. En el Experimento I analizamos si podíamos replicar los resultados anteriores sobre la capacidad de discriminación lingüística de los oyentes con jueces nativos de alemán de Suiza. Los resultados muestran que la discriminación de inglés y japonés basada en claves de duración conduce a los mismos resultados que en experimentos anteriores. En el Experimento II analizamos la capacidad de los oyentes para distinguir entre lenguas pertenecientes a diferentes clases rítmicas (inglés-francés, francés-japonés, español-japonés) y a la misma clase rítmica (español-francés). Los resultados pusieron de manifiesto que la distinción por parte de los oyentes no se encontraba por encima del nivel del azar para todos los contrastes entre lenguas. En el Experimento III añadimos la entonación a los contrastes entre francés e inglés y entre español y francés. Los resultados revelan un efecto significativo de la entonación para el contraste francés-inglés pero no para el contraste español-francés. Los experimentos muestran que la clave primaria que los hablantes usan para distinguir entre lenguas de diferente clase rítmica no es generalmente la duración, como previamente se había propuesto, sino que también puede ser la entonación. Por último, se analizan las implicaciones de los resultados para la teoría de que las lenguas pueden clasificarse según su ritmo de habla (hipótesis de la clase rítmica).

Previous research argued that listeners can distinguish between languages of different rhythm class but not of the same class (class discrimination hypothesis). In the present research we tested the role of duration and pitch cues (intonation) in this process. In Experiment I we tested whether we could replicate previous findings on listeners’ language discrimination ability with native Swiss German listeners. Results showed that the discrimination of English and Japanese based on durational cues led to the same results as in previous experiments. In Experiment II we tested listeners’ ability to distinguish between languages belonging to different rhythm classes (English-French, French-Japanese, Spanish-Japanese) and the same rhythm class (Spanish-French). Results revealed that listeners’ distinction was not above chance level for all language contrasts. In Experiment III we added intonation to a French-English and a Spanish-French language contrast. Results revealed a significant effect of intonation for the French-English but not the Spanish-French contrast. The experiments showed that the primary cue for listeners to distinguish between languages of different rhythm class is not generally duration, as previously hypothesized, but it can also be intonation. Implications of the findings on the theory that languages can be classified according to their speech rhythm (rhythm class hypothesis) are discussed.

Los oyentes podrían basarse en la entonación para distinguir lenguas de diferentes clases rítmicas.-Algunas investigaciones anteriores sostienen que los oyentes pueden distinguir entre lenguas de diferente ritmo pero, en cambio, no de la misma clase rítmica (hipótesis de la discriminación de clases). En la presente investigación examinamos el papel de la duración y de las claves tonales (entonación) en este proceso. En el Experimento I analizamos si podíamos replicar los resultados anteriores sobre la capacidad de discriminación lingüística de los oyentes con jueces nativos de alemán de Suiza. Los resultados muestran que la discriminación de inglés y japonés basada en claves de duración conduce a los mismos resultados que en experimentos anteriores. En el Experimento II analizamos la capacidad de los oyentes para distinguir entre lenguas pertenecientes a diferentes clases rítmicas (inglés-francés, francés-japonés, español-japonés) y a la misma clase rítmica (español-francés). Los resultados pusieron de manifiesto que la distinción por parte de los oyentes no se encontraba por encima del nivel del azar para todos los contrastes entre lenguas. En el Experimento III añadimos la entonación a los contrastes entre francés e inglés y entre español y francés. Los resultados revelan un efecto significativo de la entonación para el contraste francés-inglés pero no para el contraste español-francés. Los experimentos muestran que la clave primaria que los hablantes usan para distinguir entre lenguas de diferente clase rítmica no es generalmente la duración, como previamente se había propuesto, sino que también puede ser la entonación. Por último, se analizan las implicaciones de los resultados para la teoría de que las lenguas pueden clasificarse según su ritmo de habla (hipótesis de la clase rítmica).

Altmetrics

Downloads

19 downloads since deposited on 03 Jan 2015
9 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Comparative Linguistics
Dewey Decimal Classification:490 Other languages
890 Other literatures
410 Linguistics
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:03 Jan 2015 19:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:40
Publisher:Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)
ISSN:2386-2637
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3989/loquens.2014.008

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 2kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations