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Dynamic intravoxel incoherent motion imaging of skeletal muscle at rest and after exercise


Filli, Lukas; Boss, Andreas; Wurnig, Moritz C; Kenkel, David; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman (2015). Dynamic intravoxel incoherent motion imaging of skeletal muscle at rest and after exercise. NMR in Biomedicine, 28(2):240-246.

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion imaging (IVIM) for non-invasive quantification of perfusion and diffusion effects in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise. After IRB approval, eight healthy volunteers underwent diffusion-weighted MRI of the forearm at 3 T and eight different b values between 0 and 500 s/mm(2) with a temporal resolution of 57 s per dataset. Dynamic images were acquired before and after a standardized handgrip exercise. Diffusion (D) and pseudodiffusion (D*) coefficients as well as the perfusion fraction (FP ) were measured in regions of interest in the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus (FDS/FDP), brachioradialis, and extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles by using a multi-step bi-exponential analysis in MATLAB. Parametrical maps were calculated voxel-wise. Differences in D, D*, and FP between muscle groups and between time points were calculated using a repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni tests. Mean values and standard deviations at rest were the following: D*, 28.5 ± 11.4 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s; FP , 0.03 ± 0.01; D, 1.45 ± 0.09 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s. Changes of IVIM parameters were clearly visible on the parametrical maps. In the FDS/FDP, D* increased by 289 ± 236% (p < 0.029), FP by 138 ± 58% (p < 0.01), and D by 17 ± 9% (p < 0.01). A significant increase of IVIM parameters could also be detected in the brachioradialis muscle, which however was significantly lower than in the FDS/FDP. After 20 min, all parameters were still significantly elevated in the FDS/FDP but not in the brachioradialis muscle compared with the resting state. The IVIM approach allows simultaneous quantification of muscle perfusion and diffusion effects at rest and following exercise. It may thus provide a useful alternative to other non-invasive methods such as arterial spin labeling. Possible fields of interest for this technique include perfusion-related muscle diseases, such as peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion imaging (IVIM) for non-invasive quantification of perfusion and diffusion effects in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise. After IRB approval, eight healthy volunteers underwent diffusion-weighted MRI of the forearm at 3 T and eight different b values between 0 and 500 s/mm(2) with a temporal resolution of 57 s per dataset. Dynamic images were acquired before and after a standardized handgrip exercise. Diffusion (D) and pseudodiffusion (D*) coefficients as well as the perfusion fraction (FP ) were measured in regions of interest in the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus (FDS/FDP), brachioradialis, and extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles by using a multi-step bi-exponential analysis in MATLAB. Parametrical maps were calculated voxel-wise. Differences in D, D*, and FP between muscle groups and between time points were calculated using a repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni tests. Mean values and standard deviations at rest were the following: D*, 28.5 ± 11.4 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s; FP , 0.03 ± 0.01; D, 1.45 ± 0.09 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s. Changes of IVIM parameters were clearly visible on the parametrical maps. In the FDS/FDP, D* increased by 289 ± 236% (p < 0.029), FP by 138 ± 58% (p < 0.01), and D by 17 ± 9% (p < 0.01). A significant increase of IVIM parameters could also be detected in the brachioradialis muscle, which however was significantly lower than in the FDS/FDP. After 20 min, all parameters were still significantly elevated in the FDS/FDP but not in the brachioradialis muscle compared with the resting state. The IVIM approach allows simultaneous quantification of muscle perfusion and diffusion effects at rest and following exercise. It may thus provide a useful alternative to other non-invasive methods such as arterial spin labeling. Possible fields of interest for this technique include perfusion-related muscle diseases, such as peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2015
Deposited On:30 Dec 2014 10:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0952-3480
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.3245
PubMed ID:25521711

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