UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Italianity is associated with lower risk of prostate cancer mortality in Switzerland


Richard, Aline; Faeh, David; Rohrmann, Sabine; Braun, Julia; Tarnutzer, Silvan; Bopp, Matthias (2014). Italianity is associated with lower risk of prostate cancer mortality in Switzerland. Cancer Causes & Control, 25(11):1523-1529.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Different prostate cancer mortality rates observed in European countries may depend on cultural background. We aimed at exploring variation in prostate cancer mortality in the language regions of Switzerland as a function of "Italianity", a proxy for adherence to an Italian lifestyle.
METHODS: We used data of the Swiss National Cohort, a census-based record linkage study, consisting of census (1990 and 2000) and mortality (until 2008) data. 1,163,271 Swiss and Italian nationals 40+-year old were included. Multivariate age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rates and hazard ratios (HR) from Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were performed. Italianity was defined by an individual's nationality, place of birth and principal language, resulting in a score of 0-3 points.
RESULTS: Age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rates (per 100,000 person-years) were lowest in the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland (66.7 vs. 87.3 in the German-speaking region). Both Italian nationality and/or place of birth were significantly associated with lower mortality. There was a graded inverse association between mortality rates and increasing Italianity score. Individuals with the highest level of Italianity had a HR of 0.67 (95 % CI 0.59-0.76) compared to those with an Italianity score of zero. Results were similar when looking at language regions separately.
CONCLUSIONS: The strong and consistent association between Italianity and prostate cancer mortality suggests protective properties of an Italian lifestyle. Further research is required in order to determine which factors specific for Italian culture are responsible for the lower prostate cancer mortality.

PURPOSE: Different prostate cancer mortality rates observed in European countries may depend on cultural background. We aimed at exploring variation in prostate cancer mortality in the language regions of Switzerland as a function of "Italianity", a proxy for adherence to an Italian lifestyle.
METHODS: We used data of the Swiss National Cohort, a census-based record linkage study, consisting of census (1990 and 2000) and mortality (until 2008) data. 1,163,271 Swiss and Italian nationals 40+-year old were included. Multivariate age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rates and hazard ratios (HR) from Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were performed. Italianity was defined by an individual's nationality, place of birth and principal language, resulting in a score of 0-3 points.
RESULTS: Age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rates (per 100,000 person-years) were lowest in the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland (66.7 vs. 87.3 in the German-speaking region). Both Italian nationality and/or place of birth were significantly associated with lower mortality. There was a graded inverse association between mortality rates and increasing Italianity score. Individuals with the highest level of Italianity had a HR of 0.67 (95 % CI 0.59-0.76) compared to those with an Italianity score of zero. Results were similar when looking at language regions separately.
CONCLUSIONS: The strong and consistent association between Italianity and prostate cancer mortality suggests protective properties of an Italian lifestyle. Further research is required in order to determine which factors specific for Italian culture are responsible for the lower prostate cancer mortality.

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 29 Dec 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:29 Dec 2014 12:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:42
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0957-5243
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-014-0456-5
PubMed ID:25146443
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-103473

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 230kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations