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Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns


Nieder, C; Andratschke, N H; Grosu, A L (2014). Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns. Oncology Letters, 8(3):972-976.

Abstract

Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential indicators of scientific impact. Highly cited articles, arbitrarily defined as those with ≥15 citations, were identified via a systematic search of the citation database, Scopus. Up to 608 articles per year were published between 2006 and 2010, however, <10% of publications in each year accumulated ≥15 citations. This figure is notably low, when compared with other oncology studies. A large variety of preclinical and clinical topics, including toxicity prediction, the dose-volume relationship and radioprotectors, accumulated ≥15 citations. However, clinical prevention or mitigation studies were underrepresented. The following conclusion may be drawn from the present study; despite the improved technology that has resulted in superior dose distribution, clinical prevention or mitigation studies are critical and must receive higher priority, funding and attention.

Abstract

Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential indicators of scientific impact. Highly cited articles, arbitrarily defined as those with ≥15 citations, were identified via a systematic search of the citation database, Scopus. Up to 608 articles per year were published between 2006 and 2010, however, <10% of publications in each year accumulated ≥15 citations. This figure is notably low, when compared with other oncology studies. A large variety of preclinical and clinical topics, including toxicity prediction, the dose-volume relationship and radioprotectors, accumulated ≥15 citations. However, clinical prevention or mitigation studies were underrepresented. The following conclusion may be drawn from the present study; despite the improved technology that has resulted in superior dose distribution, clinical prevention or mitigation studies are critical and must receive higher priority, funding and attention.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Radiation Oncology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:07 Jan 2015 15:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:44
Publisher:Spandidos Publications
ISSN:1792-1074
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2014.2252
PubMed ID:25120644

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