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Renal replacement therapy for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Europe: prevalence and survival - an analysis of data from the ERA-EDTA Registry


Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther; Orskov, Bjarne; Wanner, Christoph; Abad, Jose M; Aresté, Nuria; de la Torre, Ramón Alonso; Caskey, Fergus; Couchoud, Cécile; Finne, Patrik; Heaf, James; Hoitsma, Andries; de Meester, Johan; Pascual, Julio; Postorino, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Zurriaga, Oscar; Jager, Kitty J; Gansevoort, Ron T (2014). Renal replacement therapy for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Europe: prevalence and survival - an analysis of data from the ERA-EDTA Registry. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation, 29 Suppl:iv15-iv25.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Still, there are few epidemiological data on the prevalence of, and survival on RRT for ADPKD.
METHODS: This study used data from the ERA-EDTA Registry on RRT prevalence and survival on RRT in 12 European countries with 208 million inhabitants. We studied four 5-year periods (1991-2010). Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and by Cox proportional hazards regression.
RESULTS: From the first to the last study period, the prevalence of RRT for ADPKD increased from 56.8 to 91.1 per million population (pmp). The percentage of prevalent RRT patients with ADPKD remained fairly stable at 9.8%. Two-year survival of ADPKD patients on RRT (adjusted for age, sex and country) increased significantly from 89.0 to 92.8%, and was higher than for non-ADPKD subjects. Improved survival was noted for all RRT modalities: haemodialysis [adjusted hazard ratio for mortality during the last versus first time period 0.75 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.91), peritoneal dialysis 0.55 (0.38-0.80) and transplantation 0.52 (0.32-0.74)]. Cardiovascular mortality as a proportion of total mortality on RRT decreased more in ADPKD patients (from 53 to 29%), than in non-ADPKD patients (from 44 to 35%). Of note, the incidence rate of RRT for ADPKD remained relatively stable at 7.6 versus 8.3 pmp from the first to the last study period, which will be discussed in detail in a separate study.
CONCLUSIONS: In ADPKD patients on RRT, survival has improved markedly, especially due to a decrease in cardiovascular mortality. This has led to a considerable increase in the number of ADPKD patients being treated with RRT.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Still, there are few epidemiological data on the prevalence of, and survival on RRT for ADPKD.
METHODS: This study used data from the ERA-EDTA Registry on RRT prevalence and survival on RRT in 12 European countries with 208 million inhabitants. We studied four 5-year periods (1991-2010). Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and by Cox proportional hazards regression.
RESULTS: From the first to the last study period, the prevalence of RRT for ADPKD increased from 56.8 to 91.1 per million population (pmp). The percentage of prevalent RRT patients with ADPKD remained fairly stable at 9.8%. Two-year survival of ADPKD patients on RRT (adjusted for age, sex and country) increased significantly from 89.0 to 92.8%, and was higher than for non-ADPKD subjects. Improved survival was noted for all RRT modalities: haemodialysis [adjusted hazard ratio for mortality during the last versus first time period 0.75 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.91), peritoneal dialysis 0.55 (0.38-0.80) and transplantation 0.52 (0.32-0.74)]. Cardiovascular mortality as a proportion of total mortality on RRT decreased more in ADPKD patients (from 53 to 29%), than in non-ADPKD patients (from 44 to 35%). Of note, the incidence rate of RRT for ADPKD remained relatively stable at 7.6 versus 8.3 pmp from the first to the last study period, which will be discussed in detail in a separate study.
CONCLUSIONS: In ADPKD patients on RRT, survival has improved markedly, especially due to a decrease in cardiovascular mortality. This has led to a considerable increase in the number of ADPKD patients being treated with RRT.

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Contributors:Olivier Devuyst, WGIKD
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:03 Feb 2015 14:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:45
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0931-0509
Additional Information:This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in NDT following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Nephrol. Dial. Transplant. (2014) 29 (suppl 4): iv15-iv25 is available online at: http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/content/29/suppl_4/iv15
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfu017
PubMed ID:25165182

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