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The physiology of altered eating behaviour after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass


le Roux, Carel W; Bueter, Marco (2014). The physiology of altered eating behaviour after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Experimental Physiology, 99(9):1128-1132.

Abstract

Obesity and its related comorbidities can be detrimental for the affected individual, as well as constituting a major challenge to public health systems worldwide. Currently, the most effective treatment option leading to clinically significant and maintained body weight loss and reduction in obesity-related morbidity and mortality is obesity surgery, which is recommended for patients with a body mass index of >40 kg m(-2), or >35 kg m(-2) if obesity-associated comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, are present. This report focuses on the altered eating behaviour after the most common of these operations, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Animal and human experiments designed to understand the underlying physiological mechanisms of altered taste and appetite are discussed.

Obesity and its related comorbidities can be detrimental for the affected individual, as well as constituting a major challenge to public health systems worldwide. Currently, the most effective treatment option leading to clinically significant and maintained body weight loss and reduction in obesity-related morbidity and mortality is obesity surgery, which is recommended for patients with a body mass index of >40 kg m(-2), or >35 kg m(-2) if obesity-associated comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, are present. This report focuses on the altered eating behaviour after the most common of these operations, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Animal and human experiments designed to understand the underlying physiological mechanisms of altered taste and appetite are discussed.

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:23 Jan 2015 07:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:46
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0958-0670
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1113/expphysiol.2014.078378
PubMed ID:25210112

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