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State-of-the-art in compressed GPU-based direct volume rendering


Rodriguez, Marcos Balsa; Gobbetti, Enrico; Guitian, Jose Antonio Iglesias; Makhinya, Maxim; Marton, Fabio; Pajarola, R; Suter, S K (2014). State-of-the-art in compressed GPU-based direct volume rendering. Computer Graphics Forum, 33(6):77-100.

Abstract

Great advancements in commodity graphics hardware have favoured graphics processing unit (GPU)-based volume rendering as the main adopted solution for interactive exploration of rectilinear scalar volumes on commodity platforms. Nevertheless, long data transfer times and GPU memory size limitations are often the main limiting factors, especially for massive, time-varying or multi-volume visualization, as well as for networked visualization on the emerging mobile devices. To address this issue, a variety of level-of-detail (LOD) data representations and compression techniques have been introduced. In order to improve capabilities and performance over the entire storage, distribution and rendering pipeline, the encoding/decoding process is typically highly asymmetric, and systems should ideally compress at data production time and decompress on demand at rendering time. Compression and LOD pre-computation does not have to adhere to real-time constraints and can be performed off-line for high-quality results. In contrast, adaptive real-time rendering from compressed representations requires fast, transient and spatially independent decompression. In this report, we review the existing compressed GPU volume rendering approaches, covering sampling grid layouts, compact representation models, compression techniques, GPU rendering architectures and fast decoding techniques.

Great advancements in commodity graphics hardware have favoured graphics processing unit (GPU)-based volume rendering as the main adopted solution for interactive exploration of rectilinear scalar volumes on commodity platforms. Nevertheless, long data transfer times and GPU memory size limitations are often the main limiting factors, especially for massive, time-varying or multi-volume visualization, as well as for networked visualization on the emerging mobile devices. To address this issue, a variety of level-of-detail (LOD) data representations and compression techniques have been introduced. In order to improve capabilities and performance over the entire storage, distribution and rendering pipeline, the encoding/decoding process is typically highly asymmetric, and systems should ideally compress at data production time and decompress on demand at rendering time. Compression and LOD pre-computation does not have to adhere to real-time constraints and can be performed off-line for high-quality results. In contrast, adaptive real-time rendering from compressed representations requires fast, transient and spatially independent decompression. In this report, we review the existing compressed GPU volume rendering approaches, covering sampling grid layouts, compact representation models, compression techniques, GPU rendering architectures and fast decoding techniques.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Uncontrolled Keywords:visualization, volume rendering, compression, GPU, ray casting
Language:English
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:22 Jan 2015 15:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:46
Publisher:The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cgf.12280
Official URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cgf.12280/abstract
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:10253

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