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Blood values of clinically healthy captive beira antelopes (Dorcatragus megalotis) and during an outbreak of fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome (FPPS)


Gull, J M; Hebel, Christiana; Arif, Abdi; Deb, A; Clauss, Marcus; Hatt, J M; Hammer, S (2014). Blood values of clinically healthy captive beira antelopes (Dorcatragus megalotis) and during an outbreak of fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome (FPPS). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, 45(4):735-743.

Abstract

Currently the only captive population of beira antelope (Dorcatragus megalotis) is held at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, Qatar. An outbreak of a severe respiratory disease—fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome, most likely caused by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae—led to a marked population decline. Reactive systemic inflammatory (AA) amyloidosis was noted as a chronic manifestation of the disease. Blood samples had been collected for biochemistry and hematology baseline values prior to the outbreak. Population-level changes were analyzed before and during the course of the outbreak in selected blood parameters (white blood cells [WBC], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], and creatinine). The annual population WBC increased and decreased concurrently with the population size, with a significant correlation between the two measures (R = 0.92; P < 0.001). Both BUN and creatinine values were higher during the outbreak. These values peaked at the same time as mortality, which was 1 yr after the WBC peak. These changes were interpreted as the transition from an acute disease with a primary respiratory manifestation into a chronic condition where renal amyloidosis led to chronic renal failure and death. Also, elevated liver values in diseased animals were attributed to amyloidosis. Parallels to a literature report on a lung disease complex caused by M. ovipneumoniae in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were found. Trends in population-level blood values of the beira antelopes implicate amyloidosis as a significant, longterm consequence of the putative Mycoplasma infection.

Currently the only captive population of beira antelope (Dorcatragus megalotis) is held at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, Qatar. An outbreak of a severe respiratory disease—fibrinous pleuropneumonia syndrome, most likely caused by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae—led to a marked population decline. Reactive systemic inflammatory (AA) amyloidosis was noted as a chronic manifestation of the disease. Blood samples had been collected for biochemistry and hematology baseline values prior to the outbreak. Population-level changes were analyzed before and during the course of the outbreak in selected blood parameters (white blood cells [WBC], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], and creatinine). The annual population WBC increased and decreased concurrently with the population size, with a significant correlation between the two measures (R = 0.92; P < 0.001). Both BUN and creatinine values were higher during the outbreak. These values peaked at the same time as mortality, which was 1 yr after the WBC peak. These changes were interpreted as the transition from an acute disease with a primary respiratory manifestation into a chronic condition where renal amyloidosis led to chronic renal failure and death. Also, elevated liver values in diseased animals were attributed to amyloidosis. Parallels to a literature report on a lung disease complex caused by M. ovipneumoniae in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were found. Trends in population-level blood values of the beira antelopes implicate amyloidosis as a significant, longterm consequence of the putative Mycoplasma infection.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:04 Feb 2015 10:06
Last Modified:26 Oct 2016 07:03
Publisher:American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
ISSN:1042-7260
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1638/2013-0073.1
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-104380

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