UZH-Logo

Markers to evaluate the quality and self-renewing potential of engineered human skin substitutes in vitro and after transplantation


Pontiggia, L; Biedermann, T; Meuli, M; Widmer, D; Böttcher-Haberzeth, S; Schiestl, C; Schneider, J; Braziulis, E; Montaño, I; Meuli-Simmen, C; Reichmann, E (2009). Markers to evaluate the quality and self-renewing potential of engineered human skin substitutes in vitro and after transplantation. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 129(2):480-490.

Abstract

We screened a series of antibodies for their exclusive binding to the human hair follicle bulge. In a second step these antibodies were to be used to identify basal keratinocytes and potential epithelial stem cells in the human epidermis and in engineered skin substitutes. Of all the antibodies screened, we identified only one, designated C8/144B, that exclusively recognized the hair follicle bulge. However, C8/144B-binding cells were never detected in the human epidermal stratum basale. In the bulge C8/144B-binding cells gave rise to cytokeratin 19-positive cells, which were also tracked in the outer root sheath between bulge and the hair follicle matrix. Remarkably, cytokeratin 19-expressing cells were never detected in the hair follicle infundibulum. Yet, cytokeratin 19-expressing keratinocytes were found in the epidermal stratum basale of normal skin as a subpopulation of cytokeratin 15-positive (not C8/144B-positive) basal keratinocytes. Cytokeratin 19/cytokeratin 15-positive keratinocytes decreased significantly with age. We suggest that cytokeratin 19-expressing cells represent a subpopulation of basal keratinocytes in neonates and young children (up to 1.5 years) that is particularly adapted to the lateral expansion of growing skin. Our data show that cytokeratin 19 in combination with cytokeratin 15 is an important marker to routinely monitor epidermal homeostasis and (at least indirectly) the self-renewing potential of engineered skin.

We screened a series of antibodies for their exclusive binding to the human hair follicle bulge. In a second step these antibodies were to be used to identify basal keratinocytes and potential epithelial stem cells in the human epidermis and in engineered skin substitutes. Of all the antibodies screened, we identified only one, designated C8/144B, that exclusively recognized the hair follicle bulge. However, C8/144B-binding cells were never detected in the human epidermal stratum basale. In the bulge C8/144B-binding cells gave rise to cytokeratin 19-positive cells, which were also tracked in the outer root sheath between bulge and the hair follicle matrix. Remarkably, cytokeratin 19-expressing cells were never detected in the hair follicle infundibulum. Yet, cytokeratin 19-expressing keratinocytes were found in the epidermal stratum basale of normal skin as a subpopulation of cytokeratin 15-positive (not C8/144B-positive) basal keratinocytes. Cytokeratin 19/cytokeratin 15-positive keratinocytes decreased significantly with age. We suggest that cytokeratin 19-expressing cells represent a subpopulation of basal keratinocytes in neonates and young children (up to 1.5 years) that is particularly adapted to the lateral expansion of growing skin. Our data show that cytokeratin 19 in combination with cytokeratin 15 is an important marker to routinely monitor epidermal homeostasis and (at least indirectly) the self-renewing potential of engineered skin.

Citations

63 citations in Web of Science®
66 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 16 Jan 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:21 August 2009
Deposited On:16 Jan 2009 13:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:50
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0022-202X
Additional Information:Originally published in 2009
Publisher DOI:10.1038/jid.2008.254
PubMed ID:18719609
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-10446

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 4MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations