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Long-term outcome of segmental reconstruction of the humeral head for the treatment of locked posterior dislocation of the shoulder


Gerber, Christian; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Jundt-Ecker, Michele; Farshad, Mazda (2014). Long-term outcome of segmental reconstruction of the humeral head for the treatment of locked posterior dislocation of the shoulder. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 23(11):1682-1690.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Locked posterior glenohumeral dislocations with impaction fractures involving less than 30% to 35% of the humeral head are most frequently treated with lesser tuberosity transfer into the defect, whereas those involving more than 35% to 40% are treated with humeral head arthroplasty. As an alternative, reconstruction of the defect with segmental femoral or humeral head allograft has been proposed, but the long-term outcome of this joint-preserving procedure is unknown. METHODS Twenty-two shoulders in 21 patients with a locked posterior shoulder dislocation and an impaction of at least 30% (mean, 43%) of the humeral head were treated with segmental reconstruction of the humeral head defect. They were reviewed clinically and radiographically at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. RESULTS Of the 22 shoulders, 19 could be followed up at 128 months (range, 60-294 months) postoperatively. Only 2 of the 19 patients needed a prosthesis more than 180 months after the index operation. Of the other 17, 4 had radiographically advanced osteoarthritis (OA), 4 had mild OA, and 9 had no or minimal OA. Eighteen shoulders were rated as subjectively excellent, none were rated as good, and one was rated as fair. The final Constant-Murley score averaged 77 points (range, 52-98 points), the Subjective Shoulder Value averaged 88% (range, 75%-100%), and only 2 patients had mild to moderate pain. Mean active anterior elevation was 145°, and mean external rotation with the arm at the side was 42°. CONCLUSION Segmental reconstruction of humeral head defects for large anteromedial impaction fractures caused by locked posterior dislocations durably restores stability and freedom from pain with an excellent subjective long-term outcome.

BACKGROUND Locked posterior glenohumeral dislocations with impaction fractures involving less than 30% to 35% of the humeral head are most frequently treated with lesser tuberosity transfer into the defect, whereas those involving more than 35% to 40% are treated with humeral head arthroplasty. As an alternative, reconstruction of the defect with segmental femoral or humeral head allograft has been proposed, but the long-term outcome of this joint-preserving procedure is unknown. METHODS Twenty-two shoulders in 21 patients with a locked posterior shoulder dislocation and an impaction of at least 30% (mean, 43%) of the humeral head were treated with segmental reconstruction of the humeral head defect. They were reviewed clinically and radiographically at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. RESULTS Of the 22 shoulders, 19 could be followed up at 128 months (range, 60-294 months) postoperatively. Only 2 of the 19 patients needed a prosthesis more than 180 months after the index operation. Of the other 17, 4 had radiographically advanced osteoarthritis (OA), 4 had mild OA, and 9 had no or minimal OA. Eighteen shoulders were rated as subjectively excellent, none were rated as good, and one was rated as fair. The final Constant-Murley score averaged 77 points (range, 52-98 points), the Subjective Shoulder Value averaged 88% (range, 75%-100%), and only 2 patients had mild to moderate pain. Mean active anterior elevation was 145°, and mean external rotation with the arm at the side was 42°. CONCLUSION Segmental reconstruction of humeral head defects for large anteromedial impaction fractures caused by locked posterior dislocations durably restores stability and freedom from pain with an excellent subjective long-term outcome.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:November 2014
Deposited On:16 Jan 2015 14:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1058-2746
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2014.03.017
PubMed ID:24930838
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-104558

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