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Age, trauma and the critical shoulder angle accurately predict supraspinatus tendon tears


Moor, B K; Röthlisberger, M; Müller, D A; Zumstein, M A; Bouaicha, S; Ehlinger, M; Gerber, C (2014). Age, trauma and the critical shoulder angle accurately predict supraspinatus tendon tears. Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Surgery & Research (OTSR), 100(5):489-494.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The pathogenesis of full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff remains unclear. Apart from age and trauma, distinct scapular morphologies have been found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether a score formed using these established risk factors was able to predict the presence of a rotator cuff tear reliably. METHODS We retrospectively assessed a consecutive series of patients with a minimal age of 40 years old, who had true antero-posterior (AP) radiographs of their shoulders, as well as a magnetic resonance (MR) gadolinium-arthrography, between January and December 2011. In all of these patients, the critical shoulder angle (CSA) was determined, and MR images were assessed for the presence of rotator cuff tears. Additionally, the patients' charts were reviewed to obtain details of symptom onset. Based on these factors, the so-called rotator cuff tear (RCT) score was calculated. RESULTS Patients with full-thickness RCTs were significantly older and had significantly larger CSAs than patients with intact rotator cuffs. Multiple logistic regression, using trauma, age and CSA as independent variables, revealed areas under the curve (AUCs) for trauma of 0.55, for age of 0.65 and for CSA of 0.86. The combination of all three factors was the most powerful predictor, with an AUC of 0.92. CONCLUSION Age, trauma and the CSA can accurately predict the presence of a posterosuperior RCT. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Level IV. Case series with no comparison groups.

BACKGROUND The pathogenesis of full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff remains unclear. Apart from age and trauma, distinct scapular morphologies have been found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether a score formed using these established risk factors was able to predict the presence of a rotator cuff tear reliably. METHODS We retrospectively assessed a consecutive series of patients with a minimal age of 40 years old, who had true antero-posterior (AP) radiographs of their shoulders, as well as a magnetic resonance (MR) gadolinium-arthrography, between January and December 2011. In all of these patients, the critical shoulder angle (CSA) was determined, and MR images were assessed for the presence of rotator cuff tears. Additionally, the patients' charts were reviewed to obtain details of symptom onset. Based on these factors, the so-called rotator cuff tear (RCT) score was calculated. RESULTS Patients with full-thickness RCTs were significantly older and had significantly larger CSAs than patients with intact rotator cuffs. Multiple logistic regression, using trauma, age and CSA as independent variables, revealed areas under the curve (AUCs) for trauma of 0.55, for age of 0.65 and for CSA of 0.86. The combination of all three factors was the most powerful predictor, with an AUC of 0.92. CONCLUSION Age, trauma and the CSA can accurately predict the presence of a posterosuperior RCT. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Level IV. Case series with no comparison groups.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:16 Jan 2015 14:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1877-0568
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otsr.2014.03.022
PubMed ID:25012397

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