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Phenotype and genotype in Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome


Sousa, Sérgio B; Hennekam, Raoul C (2014). Phenotype and genotype in Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics, 166(3):302-314.

Abstract

Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS) is an intellectual disability (ID)/multiple congenital anomalies syndrome caused by non-truncating mutations in the ATPase region of SMARCA2, which codes for one of the two alternative catalytic subunits of the BAF chromatin remodeling complex. We analyzed 61 molecularly confirmed cases, including all previously reported patients (n = 47) and 14 additional unpublished individuals. NCBRS is clinically and genetically homogeneous. The cardinal features (ID, short stature, microcephaly, typical face, sparse hair, brachydactyly, prominent interphalangeal joints, behavioral problems and seizures), are almost universally present. There is variability however, as ID can range from severe to mild, and sparse hair may be present only in certain age groups. There may be a correlation between the severity of the ID and presence of seizures, absent speech, short stature and microcephaly. SMARCA2 mutations causing NCBRS are likely to act through a dominant-negative effect. There may be some genotype-phenotype correlations (mutations at domain VI with severe ID and seizures; mutations affecting residues Pro883, Leu946, and Ala1201 with mild phenotypes) but numbers are still too small to draw definitive conclusions.

Abstract

Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS) is an intellectual disability (ID)/multiple congenital anomalies syndrome caused by non-truncating mutations in the ATPase region of SMARCA2, which codes for one of the two alternative catalytic subunits of the BAF chromatin remodeling complex. We analyzed 61 molecularly confirmed cases, including all previously reported patients (n = 47) and 14 additional unpublished individuals. NCBRS is clinically and genetically homogeneous. The cardinal features (ID, short stature, microcephaly, typical face, sparse hair, brachydactyly, prominent interphalangeal joints, behavioral problems and seizures), are almost universally present. There is variability however, as ID can range from severe to mild, and sparse hair may be present only in certain age groups. There may be a correlation between the severity of the ID and presence of seizures, absent speech, short stature and microcephaly. SMARCA2 mutations causing NCBRS are likely to act through a dominant-negative effect. There may be some genotype-phenotype correlations (mutations at domain VI with severe ID and seizures; mutations affecting residues Pro883, Leu946, and Ala1201 with mild phenotypes) but numbers are still too small to draw definitive conclusions.

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Additional indexing

Contributors:Nicolaides-Baraitser Syndrome International Consortium
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:04 Feb 2015 16:17
Last Modified:13 Nov 2016 06:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1552-4868
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.c.31409
PubMed ID:25169058

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