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Cognitive control predicted by color vision, and vice versa


Colzato, Lorenza S; Sellaro, Roberta; Hulka, Lea M; Quednow, Boris B; Hommel, Bernhard (2014). Cognitive control predicted by color vision, and vice versa. Neuropsychologia, 62:55-59.

Abstract

One of the most important functions of cognitive control is to continuously adapt cognitive processes to changing and often conflicting demands of the environment. Dopamine (DA) has been suggested to play a key role in the signaling and resolution of such response conflict. Given that DA is found in high concentration in the retina, color vision discrimination has been suggested as an index of DA functioning and in particular blue-yellow color vision impairment (CVI) has been used to indicate a central hypodopaminergic state. We used color discrimination (indexed by the total color distance score; TCDS) to predict individual differences in the cognitive control of response conflict, as reflected by conflict-resolution efficiency in an auditory Simon task. As expected, participants showing better color discrimination were more efficient in resolving response conflict. Interestingly, participants showing a blue-yellow CVI were associated with less efficiency in handling response conflict. Our findings indicate that color vision discrimination might represent a promising predictor of cognitive controlability in healthy individuals.

One of the most important functions of cognitive control is to continuously adapt cognitive processes to changing and often conflicting demands of the environment. Dopamine (DA) has been suggested to play a key role in the signaling and resolution of such response conflict. Given that DA is found in high concentration in the retina, color vision discrimination has been suggested as an index of DA functioning and in particular blue-yellow color vision impairment (CVI) has been used to indicate a central hypodopaminergic state. We used color discrimination (indexed by the total color distance score; TCDS) to predict individual differences in the cognitive control of response conflict, as reflected by conflict-resolution efficiency in an auditory Simon task. As expected, participants showing better color discrimination were more efficient in resolving response conflict. Interestingly, participants showing a blue-yellow CVI were associated with less efficiency in handling response conflict. Our findings indicate that color vision discrimination might represent a promising predictor of cognitive controlability in healthy individuals.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:16 Jan 2015 14:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0028-3932
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.07.010
PubMed ID:25058057
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-105081

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