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A qualitative study of workplace intercultural communication tensions in dyadic face-to-face and computer-mediated interactions


He, Helen Al; Huang, Elaine May (2014). A qualitative study of workplace intercultural communication tensions in dyadic face-to-face and computer-mediated interactions. In: DIS '14 Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 21 June 2014 - 25 June 2014, 415-424.

Abstract

We present findings from a qualitative study with 28 participants of the dyadic intercultural communication tensions professionals experience in Face-to-Face (FTF) and Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) workplace interactions. We identify four categories of intercultural communication tensions that emerged most frequently in our dataset including range of emotional expression, level of formality, "fixed" versus flexible appointments and task versus social-orientation. We discuss how these tensions manifested in FTF and CMC media and unravel the ways media supports or hinders intercultural communication. We present the adaptations participants made to mitigate such tensions and offer implications for design. Our findings demonstrate that the most frequently occurring intercultural communication tensions manifested in both FTF and CMC, regardless of the medium used. This indicates that cultural communication challenges will persist no matter the medium, highlighting the opportunity for technologies to better support workplace intercultural communication.

We present findings from a qualitative study with 28 participants of the dyadic intercultural communication tensions professionals experience in Face-to-Face (FTF) and Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) workplace interactions. We identify four categories of intercultural communication tensions that emerged most frequently in our dataset including range of emotional expression, level of formality, "fixed" versus flexible appointments and task versus social-orientation. We discuss how these tensions manifested in FTF and CMC media and unravel the ways media supports or hinders intercultural communication. We present the adaptations participants made to mitigate such tensions and offer implications for design. Our findings demonstrate that the most frequently occurring intercultural communication tensions manifested in both FTF and CMC, regardless of the medium used. This indicates that cultural communication challenges will persist no matter the medium, highlighting the opportunity for technologies to better support workplace intercultural communication.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:25 June 2014
Deposited On:22 Jan 2015 15:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:52
Publisher:ACM Press
ISBN:9781450329026
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/2598510.2598594
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:11622
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-105741

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