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Effect of viscogens on the kinetic response of a photoperturbed allosteric protein


Waldauer, Steven A; Stucki-Buchli, Brigitte; Frey, Lukas; Hamm, Peter (2014). Effect of viscogens on the kinetic response of a photoperturbed allosteric protein. Journal of Chemical Physics, 141(22):514.

Abstract

By covalently binding a photoswitchable linker across the binding groove of the PDZ2 domain, a small conformational change can be photo-initiated that mimics the allosteric transition of the protein. The response of its binding groove is investigated with the help of ultrafast pump-probe IR spectroscopy from picoseconds to tens of microseconds. The temperature dependence of that response is compatible with diffusive dynamics on a rugged energy landscape without any prominent energy barrier. Furthermore, the dependence of the kinetics on the concentration of certain viscogens, sucrose, and glycerol, has been investigated. A pronounced viscosity dependence is observed that can be best fit by a power law, i.e., a fractional viscosity dependence. The change of kinetics when comparing sucrose with glycerol as viscogen, however, provides strong evidence that direct interactions of the viscogen molecule with the protein do play a role as well. This conclusion is supported by accompanying molecular dynamics simulations.

By covalently binding a photoswitchable linker across the binding groove of the PDZ2 domain, a small conformational change can be photo-initiated that mimics the allosteric transition of the protein. The response of its binding groove is investigated with the help of ultrafast pump-probe IR spectroscopy from picoseconds to tens of microseconds. The temperature dependence of that response is compatible with diffusive dynamics on a rugged energy landscape without any prominent energy barrier. Furthermore, the dependence of the kinetics on the concentration of certain viscogens, sucrose, and glycerol, has been investigated. A pronounced viscosity dependence is observed that can be best fit by a power law, i.e., a fractional viscosity dependence. The change of kinetics when comparing sucrose with glycerol as viscogen, however, provides strong evidence that direct interactions of the viscogen molecule with the protein do play a role as well. This conclusion is supported by accompanying molecular dynamics simulations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:December 2014
Deposited On:19 Feb 2015 13:36
Last Modified:12 May 2016 12:25
Publisher:American Institute of Physics
ISSN:0021-9606
Funders:ERC advanced investigator grant (DYNALLO), Swiss National Science foundation through the NCCR MUST
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4897975
PubMed ID:25494785
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-106218

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