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Spatial orienting following dynamic cues in infancy: Grasping hands versus inanimate objects


Wronski, Caroline; Daum, Moritz M (2014). Spatial orienting following dynamic cues in infancy: Grasping hands versus inanimate objects. Developmental Psychology, 50(8):2020-2029.

Abstract

Movement perception facilitates spatial orienting of attention in infants (Farroni, Johnson, Brockbank, & Simion, 2000). In a series of 4 experiments, we investigated how orienting of attention in infancy is modulated by dynamic stimuli. Experiment 1 (N = 36) demonstrated that 5-month-olds as well as 7-month-olds orient to the direction of a dynamically grasping human hand. Experiment 2 (N = 36) showed that 7-month-olds orient covertly to direction of a geometrical shape moving on the trajectory of the grasping movement, but 5-month-olds do not. Experiment 3 (N = 18) showed that mere linear translating object movement does not elicit covert orienting of attention in 7-month-olds. In Experiment 4 (N = 18), we found that 7-month-olds process both grasping direction and movement direction, which resulted in increased reaction times when these cues conflicted. These findings suggest that orienting of attention reflects rapid detection of goal-directed agents. Five-month-olds need the information of both movement and grasping direction, whereas 7-month-olds can use each of these directional cues in isolation.

Movement perception facilitates spatial orienting of attention in infants (Farroni, Johnson, Brockbank, & Simion, 2000). In a series of 4 experiments, we investigated how orienting of attention in infancy is modulated by dynamic stimuli. Experiment 1 (N = 36) demonstrated that 5-month-olds as well as 7-month-olds orient to the direction of a dynamically grasping human hand. Experiment 2 (N = 36) showed that 7-month-olds orient covertly to direction of a geometrical shape moving on the trajectory of the grasping movement, but 5-month-olds do not. Experiment 3 (N = 18) showed that mere linear translating object movement does not elicit covert orienting of attention in 7-month-olds. In Experiment 4 (N = 18), we found that 7-month-olds process both grasping direction and movement direction, which resulted in increased reaction times when these cues conflicted. These findings suggest that orienting of attention reflects rapid detection of goal-directed agents. Five-month-olds need the information of both movement and grasping direction, whereas 7-month-olds can use each of these directional cues in isolation.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPSYCH Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:21 Jan 2015 16:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:54
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0012-1649
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0037155
PubMed ID:24932723

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