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Small volume resuscitation with HyperHaes improves pericontusional perfusion and reduces lesion volume following controlled cortical impact injury in rats


Thomale, U W; Griebenow, M; Kroppenstedt, S N; Unterberg, A W; Stover, J F (2004). Small volume resuscitation with HyperHaes improves pericontusional perfusion and reduces lesion volume following controlled cortical impact injury in rats. Journal of Neurotrauma, 21(12):1737-1746.

Abstract

The hyperosmolar and hyperoncotic properties of HyperHaes (HHES) might improve impaired posttraumatic cerebral perfusion. Possible beneficial effects on pericontusional perfusion, brain edema, and contusion volume were investigated in rats subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 60) anesthetized with isoflurane were subjected to a left temporoparietal CCI. Thereafter, rats were randomized to receive HHES (10% hydroxyethylstarch, 7.5% NaCl) or physiological saline solution (4 mL/kg body weight) intravenously. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) were determined before and following CCI, after drug administration and 24 h later. Regional pericontusional cortical perfusion was determined by scanning laser Doppler flowmetry before CCI, and 30 min, 4 and 24 h after injury. At 24 h brain swelling and water content were measured gravimetrically. At 7 days, cortical contusion volume was determined planimetrically. MABP was not influenced by HHES. ICP was significantly decreased immediately after HHES infusion (5.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 7.1 +/- 1.0 mm Hg; p < 0.05). Pericontusional cortical perfusion was significantly decreased by 44% compared to pre-injury levels (p < 0.05). HHES significantly improved cortical perfusion at 4 h after CCI, approaching baseline values (85 +/- 12%). While increased posttraumatic brain edema was not reduced by HHES at 24 h, cortical contusion volume was significantly decreased in the HHES-treated rats at 7 days after CCI (23.4 +/- 3.5 vs. 39.6 +/- 6.2 mm3; p < 0.05). Intravaneous administration of HHES within 15 min after CCI has a neuroprotective potential, as it significantly attenuated impaired pericontusional perfusion and markedly reduced the extent of induced structural damage.

The hyperosmolar and hyperoncotic properties of HyperHaes (HHES) might improve impaired posttraumatic cerebral perfusion. Possible beneficial effects on pericontusional perfusion, brain edema, and contusion volume were investigated in rats subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 60) anesthetized with isoflurane were subjected to a left temporoparietal CCI. Thereafter, rats were randomized to receive HHES (10% hydroxyethylstarch, 7.5% NaCl) or physiological saline solution (4 mL/kg body weight) intravenously. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) were determined before and following CCI, after drug administration and 24 h later. Regional pericontusional cortical perfusion was determined by scanning laser Doppler flowmetry before CCI, and 30 min, 4 and 24 h after injury. At 24 h brain swelling and water content were measured gravimetrically. At 7 days, cortical contusion volume was determined planimetrically. MABP was not influenced by HHES. ICP was significantly decreased immediately after HHES infusion (5.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 7.1 +/- 1.0 mm Hg; p < 0.05). Pericontusional cortical perfusion was significantly decreased by 44% compared to pre-injury levels (p < 0.05). HHES significantly improved cortical perfusion at 4 h after CCI, approaching baseline values (85 +/- 12%). While increased posttraumatic brain edema was not reduced by HHES at 24 h, cortical contusion volume was significantly decreased in the HHES-treated rats at 7 days after CCI (23.4 +/- 3.5 vs. 39.6 +/- 6.2 mm3; p < 0.05). Intravaneous administration of HHES within 15 min after CCI has a neuroprotective potential, as it significantly attenuated impaired pericontusional perfusion and markedly reduced the extent of induced structural damage.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Intensive Care Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:25 Sep 2009 11:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:51
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:0897-7151
Publisher DOI:10.1089/neu.2004.21.1737
PubMed ID:15684765
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-10635

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