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Outcome in squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal vestibule: A single center experience


Vital, Domenic; Morand, Grégoire; Huber, Gerhard F; Studer, Gabriela; Holzmann, David (2015). Outcome in squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal vestibule: A single center experience. Head and Neck, 37(1):46-51.

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the nasal vestibule and to identify factors predicting recurrence.
Methods: All patients treated between 1995 and 2012 were included in this study. Outcome was analyzed with respect to modality of therapy, age, sex, tobacco consumption, staging, surgical margins, and histological differentiation pattern.
Results: Thirty patients were included. Fourteen patients (47%) were found with T4, 1 patient (3%) with T3, 7 patients (23%) with T2, and 8 patients (27%) with T1 disease. Twenty-one patients (70%) were treated surgically. Six patients (29%) needed postoperative radiation because of insufficient surgical margins. Radiation was the first-line treatment in 9 patients (30%). Surgically treated patients with surgical margins <3 mm had significantly more locoregional recurrence compared to those with sufficient resections.
Conclusion: Advanced T4 carcinomas show a high recurrence rate. Insufficient surgical margins are the main predictor for a locoregional recurrence and should be avoided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 37: 46–51, 2015

Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the nasal vestibule and to identify factors predicting recurrence.
Methods: All patients treated between 1995 and 2012 were included in this study. Outcome was analyzed with respect to modality of therapy, age, sex, tobacco consumption, staging, surgical margins, and histological differentiation pattern.
Results: Thirty patients were included. Fourteen patients (47%) were found with T4, 1 patient (3%) with T3, 7 patients (23%) with T2, and 8 patients (27%) with T1 disease. Twenty-one patients (70%) were treated surgically. Six patients (29%) needed postoperative radiation because of insufficient surgical margins. Radiation was the first-line treatment in 9 patients (30%). Surgically treated patients with surgical margins <3 mm had significantly more locoregional recurrence compared to those with sufficient resections.
Conclusion: Advanced T4 carcinomas show a high recurrence rate. Insufficient surgical margins are the main predictor for a locoregional recurrence and should be avoided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 37: 46–51, 2015

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Radiation Oncology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:squamous cell carcinoma;nasal vestibule;outcome;radiation therapy;surgery
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:05 Mar 2015 14:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1043-3074
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.23549
PubMed ID:24898621

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