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Neuroserpin.


Galliciotti, G; Sonderegger, P (2006). Neuroserpin. Frontiers in Bioscience, 11:33-45.

Abstract

Neuroserpin is a member of the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors. Tissue distribution analysis reveals a predominantly neuronal expression during the late stages of neurogenesis and, in the adult brain, in areas where synaptic changes are associated with learning and memory (synaptic plasticity). In vitro studies revealed complex formation between neuroserpin and different serine proteases, i.e. tPA, uPA, and plasmin. The neuroserpin-target complex has so far not been characterized in vivo. However, some investigations help to understand the functional role of this serpin. Neuroserpin was shown to be involved in the regulation of the morphology of neuroendocrine cells in culture, possibly by modulating the degradation of the extracellular matrix by proteolytic enzymes such as tPA. Moreover, a role of neuroserpin in mood regulation has been deduced from the over- and underexpression of neuroserpin in genetically modified mice, which showed increased anxiety and novelty-induced hypo-locomotion. In pathological conditions of the central nervous system (i.e. stroke and seizures), neuroserpin plays a neuroprotective role, probably by blocking the deleterious effects of tPA. A familial form of a neurodegenerative disease, termed familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies, is caused by point mutations in the neuroserpin gene. This condition is characterized by the intracellular polymerization and accumulation of mutated neuroserpin, leading to neuronal death and dementia.

Neuroserpin is a member of the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors. Tissue distribution analysis reveals a predominantly neuronal expression during the late stages of neurogenesis and, in the adult brain, in areas where synaptic changes are associated with learning and memory (synaptic plasticity). In vitro studies revealed complex formation between neuroserpin and different serine proteases, i.e. tPA, uPA, and plasmin. The neuroserpin-target complex has so far not been characterized in vivo. However, some investigations help to understand the functional role of this serpin. Neuroserpin was shown to be involved in the regulation of the morphology of neuroendocrine cells in culture, possibly by modulating the degradation of the extracellular matrix by proteolytic enzymes such as tPA. Moreover, a role of neuroserpin in mood regulation has been deduced from the over- and underexpression of neuroserpin in genetically modified mice, which showed increased anxiety and novelty-induced hypo-locomotion. In pathological conditions of the central nervous system (i.e. stroke and seizures), neuroserpin plays a neuroprotective role, probably by blocking the deleterious effects of tPA. A familial form of a neurodegenerative disease, termed familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies, is caused by point mutations in the neuroserpin gene. This condition is characterized by the intracellular polymerization and accumulation of mutated neuroserpin, leading to neuronal death and dementia.

Citations

27 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1 January 2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:17
Publisher:Frontiers in Bioscience
ISSN:1093-4715
Publisher DOI:10.2741/1778
Related URLs:http://www.bioscience.org/2006/v11/af/1778/fulltext.htm
PubMed ID:16146712

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