UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Virological failure after 1 year of first-line ART is not associated with HIV minority drug resistance in rural Cameroon


Zoufaly, A; Jochum, J; Hammerl, R; Nassimi, N; Raymond, Y; Burchard, G D; Schmiedel, S; Drexler, J F; Campbell, N K; Taka, N; Awasom, C; Metzner, K J; van Lunzen, J; Feldt, T (2015). Virological failure after 1 year of first-line ART is not associated with HIV minority drug resistance in rural Cameroon. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 70(3):922-925.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe clinical and virological outcomes in therapy-naive HIV-1-positive patients treated in a routine ART programme in rural Cameroon. METHODS In a prospective cohort, 300 consecutive patients starting first-line ART were enrolled and followed for 12 months. Among 238 patients with available viral load data at Month 12, logistic regression was used to analyse risk factors for virological failure (≥1000 HIV RNA copies/mL) including clinical, immunological and virological parameters, as well as data on drug adherence. Population sequencing was performed to detect the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients with virological failure at Month 12; minority drug-resistance mutations at baseline were analysed using next-generation sequencing in these patients and matched controls. RESULTS At Month 12, 38/238 (16%) patients experienced virological failure (≥1000 HIV RNA copies/mL). Patients with virological failure were younger, had lower CD4 cell counts and were more often WHO stage 3 or 4 at baseline. Sixty-three percent of patients with virological failure developed at least one drug-resistance mutation. The M184V (n = 18) and K103N (n = 10) mutations were most common. At baseline, 6/30 patients (20%) experiencing virological failure and 6/35 (17%) matched controls had evidence of minority drug-resistance mutations using next-generation sequencing (P = 0.77). Lower CD4 count at baseline (OR per 100 cells/mm(3) lower 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, P = 0.04) and poorer adherence (OR per 1% lower 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08, P < 0.001) were associated with a higher risk of virological failure. Unavailability of ART at the treatment centre was the single most common cause for incomplete adherence. CONCLUSIONS Virological failure after 1 year of ART was not associated with minority drug resistance at baseline but with incomplete adherence. Strategies to assure adherence and uninterrupted drug supplies are pivotal factors for therapy success.

OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe clinical and virological outcomes in therapy-naive HIV-1-positive patients treated in a routine ART programme in rural Cameroon. METHODS In a prospective cohort, 300 consecutive patients starting first-line ART were enrolled and followed for 12 months. Among 238 patients with available viral load data at Month 12, logistic regression was used to analyse risk factors for virological failure (≥1000 HIV RNA copies/mL) including clinical, immunological and virological parameters, as well as data on drug adherence. Population sequencing was performed to detect the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients with virological failure at Month 12; minority drug-resistance mutations at baseline were analysed using next-generation sequencing in these patients and matched controls. RESULTS At Month 12, 38/238 (16%) patients experienced virological failure (≥1000 HIV RNA copies/mL). Patients with virological failure were younger, had lower CD4 cell counts and were more often WHO stage 3 or 4 at baseline. Sixty-three percent of patients with virological failure developed at least one drug-resistance mutation. The M184V (n = 18) and K103N (n = 10) mutations were most common. At baseline, 6/30 patients (20%) experiencing virological failure and 6/35 (17%) matched controls had evidence of minority drug-resistance mutations using next-generation sequencing (P = 0.77). Lower CD4 count at baseline (OR per 100 cells/mm(3) lower 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, P = 0.04) and poorer adherence (OR per 1% lower 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08, P < 0.001) were associated with a higher risk of virological failure. Unavailability of ART at the treatment centre was the single most common cause for incomplete adherence. CONCLUSIONS Virological failure after 1 year of ART was not associated with minority drug resistance at baseline but with incomplete adherence. Strategies to assure adherence and uninterrupted drug supplies are pivotal factors for therapy success.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:13 Feb 2015 13:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:56
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0305-7453
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dku470
PubMed ID:25428920

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations