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Wanting to get more or protecting one's assets: age-differential effects of gain versus loss perceptions on the willingness to engage in collective action


Weiss, David; Sczesny, Sabine; Freund, Alexandra M (2016). Wanting to get more or protecting one's assets: age-differential effects of gain versus loss perceptions on the willingness to engage in collective action. Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 71(2):254-264.

Abstract

Objectives. The present research examined motivational differences across adulthood that might contribute to age-related differences in the willingness to engage in collective action. Two experiments addressed the role of gain and loss orientation for age-related differences in the willingness to engage in collective action across adulthood.
Method. In Experiment 1, N = 169 adults (20–85 years) were confronted with a hypothetical scenario that involved either an impending increase or decrease of health insurance costs for their respective age group. In Experiment 2, N = 231 adults (18–83 years) were asked to list an advantage or disadvantage they perceived in being a member of their age group. Subsequently, participants indicated their willingness to engage in collective action on behalf of their age group.
Results. Both experiments suggest that, with increasing age, people are more willing to engage in collective action when they are confronted with the prospect of loss or a disadvantage.
Discussion. The findings highlight the role of motivational processes for involvement in collective action across adulthood. With increasing age, (anticipated) loss or perceived disadvantages become more important for the willingness to participate in collective action.

Objectives. The present research examined motivational differences across adulthood that might contribute to age-related differences in the willingness to engage in collective action. Two experiments addressed the role of gain and loss orientation for age-related differences in the willingness to engage in collective action across adulthood.
Method. In Experiment 1, N = 169 adults (20–85 years) were confronted with a hypothetical scenario that involved either an impending increase or decrease of health insurance costs for their respective age group. In Experiment 2, N = 231 adults (18–83 years) were asked to list an advantage or disadvantage they perceived in being a member of their age group. Subsequently, participants indicated their willingness to engage in collective action on behalf of their age group.
Results. Both experiments suggest that, with increasing age, people are more willing to engage in collective action when they are confronted with the prospect of loss or a disadvantage.
Discussion. The findings highlight the role of motivational processes for involvement in collective action across adulthood. With increasing age, (anticipated) loss or perceived disadvantages become more important for the willingness to participate in collective action.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:26 Feb 2015 14:26
Last Modified:26 Apr 2016 07:49
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1079-5014
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbu098
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-107313

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