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Prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, and the immune system: experimental data and clinical evidence


Frei, Remo; Akdis, Mübeccel; O'Mahony, Liam (2015). Prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, and the immune system: experimental data and clinical evidence. Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, 31(2):153-158.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW The intestinal immune system is constantly exposed to foreign antigens, which for the most part should be tolerated. Certain probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics are able to influence immune responses. In this review, we highlight the recent publications (within the last 2 years) that have substantially progressed this field. RECENT FINDINGS The immunological mechanisms underpinning probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics effects continue to be better defined with novel mechanisms being described for dendritic cells, epithelial cells, T regulatory cells, effector lymphocytes, natural killer T cells, and B cells. Many of the mechanisms being described are bacterial strain or metabolite specific, and should not be extrapolated to other probiotics or prebiotics. In addition, the timing of intervention seems to be important, with potentially the greatest effects being observed early in life. SUMMARY In this review, we discuss the recent findings relating to probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, specifically their effects on immunological functions.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW The intestinal immune system is constantly exposed to foreign antigens, which for the most part should be tolerated. Certain probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics are able to influence immune responses. In this review, we highlight the recent publications (within the last 2 years) that have substantially progressed this field. RECENT FINDINGS The immunological mechanisms underpinning probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics effects continue to be better defined with novel mechanisms being described for dendritic cells, epithelial cells, T regulatory cells, effector lymphocytes, natural killer T cells, and B cells. Many of the mechanisms being described are bacterial strain or metabolite specific, and should not be extrapolated to other probiotics or prebiotics. In addition, the timing of intervention seems to be important, with potentially the greatest effects being observed early in life. SUMMARY In this review, we discuss the recent findings relating to probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics, specifically their effects on immunological functions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:15 January 2015
Deposited On:05 Mar 2015 16:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:01
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0267-1379
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MOG.0000000000000151
PubMed ID:25594887

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