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Arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy: A paradigm shift from right to biventricular disease


Saguner, Ardan M; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat (2014). Arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy: A paradigm shift from right to biventricular disease. World Journal of Cardiology, 6(4):154-174.

Abstract

Arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AVC) is generally referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathy/dysplasia and constitutes an inherited cardiomyopathy. Affected patients may succumb to sudden cardiac death (SCD), ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA) and heart failure. Genetic studies have identified causative mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disk that lead to reduced myocardial electro-mechanical stability. The term arrhythmogenic RV cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as biventricular involvement or isolated left ventricular (LV) involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AVC should be preferred. The diagnosis is established on a point score basis according to the revised 2010 task force criteria utilizing imaging modalities, demonstrating fibrous replacement through biopsy, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias and a positive family history including identification of genetic mutations. Although several risk factors for SCD such as previous cardiac arrest, syncope, documented VTA, severe RV/LV dysfunction and young age at manifestation have been identified, risk stratification still needs improvement, especially in asymptomatic family members. Particularly, the role of genetic testing and environmental factors has to be further elucidated. Therapeutic interventions include restriction from physical exercise, beta-blockers, sotalol, amiodarone, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation. Life-long follow-up is warranted in symptomatic patients, but also asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic mutations.

Arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AVC) is generally referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathy/dysplasia and constitutes an inherited cardiomyopathy. Affected patients may succumb to sudden cardiac death (SCD), ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA) and heart failure. Genetic studies have identified causative mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disk that lead to reduced myocardial electro-mechanical stability. The term arrhythmogenic RV cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as biventricular involvement or isolated left ventricular (LV) involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AVC should be preferred. The diagnosis is established on a point score basis according to the revised 2010 task force criteria utilizing imaging modalities, demonstrating fibrous replacement through biopsy, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias and a positive family history including identification of genetic mutations. Although several risk factors for SCD such as previous cardiac arrest, syncope, documented VTA, severe RV/LV dysfunction and young age at manifestation have been identified, risk stratification still needs improvement, especially in asymptomatic family members. Particularly, the role of genetic testing and environmental factors has to be further elucidated. Therapeutic interventions include restriction from physical exercise, beta-blockers, sotalol, amiodarone, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation. Life-long follow-up is warranted in symptomatic patients, but also asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic mutations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:26 April 2014
Deposited On:12 Feb 2015 13:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:01
Publisher:Baishideng Publishing Group Co. Limited
ISSN:1949-8462
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4330/wjc.v6.i4.154
PubMed ID:24772256
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-107889

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