UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Protective Effect of Focal Adhesion Kinase against Skeletal Muscle Reperfusion Injury after Acute Limb Ischemia


Flück, M; von Allmen, R S; Ferrié, C; Tevaearai, H; Dick, F (2014). Protective Effect of Focal Adhesion Kinase against Skeletal Muscle Reperfusion Injury after Acute Limb Ischemia. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, (S1078-5884):638.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES In cardiac muscle, ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is attenuated by mitochondrial function, which may be upregulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The aim of this study was to determine whether increased FAK levels reduced rhabdomyolysis in skeletal muscle too. MATERIAL AND METHODS In a translational in vivo experiment, rat lower limbs were subjected to 4 hours of ischemia followed by 24 or 72 hours of reperfusion. FAK expression was stimulated 7 days before (via somatic transfection with pCMV-driven FAK expression plasmid) and outcomes were measured against non-transfected and empty transfected controls. Slow oxidative (i.e., mitochondria-rich) and fast glycolytic (i.e., mitochondria-poor) type muscles were analyzed separately regarding rhabdomyolysis, apoptosis, and inflammation. Severity of IR injury was assessed using paired non-ischemic controls. RESULTS After 24 hours of reperfusion, marked rhabdomyolysis was found in non-transfected and empty plasmid-transfected fast-type glycolytic muscle, tibialis anterior. Prior transfection enhanced FAK concentration significantly (p = 0.01). Concomitantly, levels of BAX, promoting mitochondrial transition pores, were reduced sixfold (p = 0.02) together with a blunted inflammation (p = 0.01) and reduced rhabdomyolysis (p = 0.003). Slow oxidative muscle, m. soleus, reacted differently: although apoptosis was detectable after IR, rhabdomyolysis did not appear before 72 hours of reperfusion; and FAK levels were not enhanced in ischemic muscle despite transfection (p = 0.66). CONCLUSIONS IR-induced skeletal muscle rhabdomyolysis is a fiber type-specific phenomenon that appears to be modulated by mitochondria reserves. Stimulation of FAK may exploit these reserves constituting a potential therapeutic approach to reduce tissue loss following acute limb IR in fast-type muscle.

OBJECTIVES In cardiac muscle, ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is attenuated by mitochondrial function, which may be upregulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The aim of this study was to determine whether increased FAK levels reduced rhabdomyolysis in skeletal muscle too. MATERIAL AND METHODS In a translational in vivo experiment, rat lower limbs were subjected to 4 hours of ischemia followed by 24 or 72 hours of reperfusion. FAK expression was stimulated 7 days before (via somatic transfection with pCMV-driven FAK expression plasmid) and outcomes were measured against non-transfected and empty transfected controls. Slow oxidative (i.e., mitochondria-rich) and fast glycolytic (i.e., mitochondria-poor) type muscles were analyzed separately regarding rhabdomyolysis, apoptosis, and inflammation. Severity of IR injury was assessed using paired non-ischemic controls. RESULTS After 24 hours of reperfusion, marked rhabdomyolysis was found in non-transfected and empty plasmid-transfected fast-type glycolytic muscle, tibialis anterior. Prior transfection enhanced FAK concentration significantly (p = 0.01). Concomitantly, levels of BAX, promoting mitochondrial transition pores, were reduced sixfold (p = 0.02) together with a blunted inflammation (p = 0.01) and reduced rhabdomyolysis (p = 0.003). Slow oxidative muscle, m. soleus, reacted differently: although apoptosis was detectable after IR, rhabdomyolysis did not appear before 72 hours of reperfusion; and FAK levels were not enhanced in ischemic muscle despite transfection (p = 0.66). CONCLUSIONS IR-induced skeletal muscle rhabdomyolysis is a fiber type-specific phenomenon that appears to be modulated by mitochondria reserves. Stimulation of FAK may exploit these reserves constituting a potential therapeutic approach to reduce tissue loss following acute limb IR in fast-type muscle.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 06 Feb 2015
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:30 December 2014
Deposited On:06 Feb 2015 15:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1078-5884
Additional Information:Open Access Artikel
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2014.11.011
PubMed ID:25556082
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-107903

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations