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Limits on compact baryonic dark matter from gravitational microlensing


Jetzer, Philippe (2014). Limits on compact baryonic dark matter from gravitational microlensing. Physica Scripta, 89(8):084009.

Abstract

Microlensing started with the seminal paper by Paczyński in 1986 [1], followed in 1993 by the first discovery of events towards the Large Magellanic Cloud and the galactic bulge. Since then many microlensing events have been observed also towards other targets such as globular clusters, the Andromeda Galaxy. Many new applications have been found: in particular, it turned out to be a powerful method to detect planets in our galaxy and even in the nearby M31. Here, we will present some results obtained so far by microlensing without, however, being exhaustive and based on more personal views and biases.

Microlensing started with the seminal paper by Paczyński in 1986 [1], followed in 1993 by the first discovery of events towards the Large Magellanic Cloud and the galactic bulge. Since then many microlensing events have been observed also towards other targets such as globular clusters, the Andromeda Galaxy. Many new applications have been found: in particular, it turned out to be a powerful method to detect planets in our galaxy and even in the nearby M31. Here, we will present some results obtained so far by microlensing without, however, being exhaustive and based on more personal views and biases.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Date:2014
Deposited On:24 Feb 2015 11:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:02
Publisher:Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:0031-8949
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-8949/89/8/084009

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