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PREPARE: the prevalence of perioperative anaemia and need for patient blood management in elective orthopaedic surgery: A multicentre, observational study


Lasocki, Sigismond; Krauspe, Rüdiger; von Heymann, Christian; Mezzacasa, Anna; Chainey, Suki; Spahn, Donat R (2015). PREPARE: the prevalence of perioperative anaemia and need for patient blood management in elective orthopaedic surgery: A multicentre, observational study. European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 32(3):160-167.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Patient blood management (PBM) can prevent preoperative anaemia, but little is known about practice in Europe. OBJECTIVE To assess the pre and postoperative prevalence and perioperative management of anaemia in patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery in Europe. DESIGN An observational study; data were collected from patient records via electronic case report forms. SETTING Seventeen centres in six European countries. Centres were stratified according to whether they had a PBM programme or not. PATIENTS One thousand five hundred and thirty-four patients undergoing major elective hip, knee or spine surgery [49.9% hip, 37.2% knee, 13.0% spine; age 64.0 years (range 18 to 80), 61.3% female]. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Prevalence of preoperative (primary endpoint) and postoperative anaemia [haemoglobin (Hb) <13 g dl (male), Hb <12 g dl (female)], perioperative anaemia management, time to first blood transfusion and number of transfused units. Data are shown as mean (SD) or median (interquartile range). RESULTS Anaemia prevalence increased from 14.1% preoperatively to 85.8% postoperatively. Mean Hb decrease was 1.9 (1.5) and 3.0 (1.3) g dl in preoperatively anaemic and nonanaemic patients, respectively (P < 0.001). In PBM (n = 7) vs. non-PBM centres, preoperative anaemia was less frequent (8.0 vs. 18.5%; P < 0.001) and iron status was assessed more frequently (ferritin 11.0 vs. 2.6%, transferrin saturation 11.0 vs. 0.1%; P < 0.001). Perioperative anaemia correction (mainly transfusion) was given to 34.3%. Intraoperatively, 14.8% of preoperatively anaemic and 2.8% of nonanaemic patients received transfusions [units per patient: 2.4 (1.5) and 2.2 (1.4), median time to first intraoperative transfusion: 130 (88, 158) vs. 179 (135, 256) min; P < 0.001]. Postoperative complications were more frequent in preoperatively anaemic vs. nonanaemic patients (36.9 vs. 22.2%; P = 0.009). CONCLUSION Most patients who underwent elective orthopaedic surgery had normal preoperative Hb levels but became anaemic after the procedure. Those who were anaemic prior to surgery had an increased intraoperative transfusion risk and postoperative complication rate. PBM measures such as iron status assessment and strategies to avoid transfusion are still underused in Europe.

BACKGROUND Patient blood management (PBM) can prevent preoperative anaemia, but little is known about practice in Europe. OBJECTIVE To assess the pre and postoperative prevalence and perioperative management of anaemia in patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery in Europe. DESIGN An observational study; data were collected from patient records via electronic case report forms. SETTING Seventeen centres in six European countries. Centres were stratified according to whether they had a PBM programme or not. PATIENTS One thousand five hundred and thirty-four patients undergoing major elective hip, knee or spine surgery [49.9% hip, 37.2% knee, 13.0% spine; age 64.0 years (range 18 to 80), 61.3% female]. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Prevalence of preoperative (primary endpoint) and postoperative anaemia [haemoglobin (Hb) <13 g dl (male), Hb <12 g dl (female)], perioperative anaemia management, time to first blood transfusion and number of transfused units. Data are shown as mean (SD) or median (interquartile range). RESULTS Anaemia prevalence increased from 14.1% preoperatively to 85.8% postoperatively. Mean Hb decrease was 1.9 (1.5) and 3.0 (1.3) g dl in preoperatively anaemic and nonanaemic patients, respectively (P < 0.001). In PBM (n = 7) vs. non-PBM centres, preoperative anaemia was less frequent (8.0 vs. 18.5%; P < 0.001) and iron status was assessed more frequently (ferritin 11.0 vs. 2.6%, transferrin saturation 11.0 vs. 0.1%; P < 0.001). Perioperative anaemia correction (mainly transfusion) was given to 34.3%. Intraoperatively, 14.8% of preoperatively anaemic and 2.8% of nonanaemic patients received transfusions [units per patient: 2.4 (1.5) and 2.2 (1.4), median time to first intraoperative transfusion: 130 (88, 158) vs. 179 (135, 256) min; P < 0.001]. Postoperative complications were more frequent in preoperatively anaemic vs. nonanaemic patients (36.9 vs. 22.2%; P = 0.009). CONCLUSION Most patients who underwent elective orthopaedic surgery had normal preoperative Hb levels but became anaemic after the procedure. Those who were anaemic prior to surgery had an increased intraoperative transfusion risk and postoperative complication rate. PBM measures such as iron status assessment and strategies to avoid transfusion are still underused in Europe.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:March 2015
Deposited On:05 Mar 2015 14:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:04
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0265-0215
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0000000000000202
PubMed ID:25564780
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-108519

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