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Intrafamilial spread of a Panton‐Valentine leukocidin‐positive community‐acquired methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus belonging to the paediatric clone ST5 SSCmecIV


Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magda T; Stalder, Ueli; Johler, Sophia; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger; Nüesch, Hans-Jakob (2014). Intrafamilial spread of a Panton‐Valentine leukocidin‐positive community‐acquired methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus belonging to the paediatric clone ST5 SSCmecIV. JMM Case Reports:1.

Abstract

Introduction: Community‐acquired methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA‐MRSA) is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen. Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL)‐producing CA‐MRSA constitutes a public health concern because it can be responsible for severe, progressive necrotizing skin, soft‐tissue and pulmonary infections.

Case presentation: We describe a case of recurrent transmission of PVL‐producing ST5, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV MRSA (paediatric clone) from an asymptomatic nasal carrier to his family causing severe skin and soft‐tissue infections in the mother and children. Nasal application of mupirocin in the carrier was successful for prevention of new infections.

Conclusion: Recurrent skin infections are often not taken into account but may represent a serious threat if caused by a PVL‐producing MRSA strain. Family members of MRSA carriers are in danger of transmission. Characteristics of currently circulating CA‐MRSA strains require closer surveillance. Identification and decolonization of carriers is important to reduce the risk of spread into the community.

Introduction: Community‐acquired methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA‐MRSA) is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen. Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL)‐producing CA‐MRSA constitutes a public health concern because it can be responsible for severe, progressive necrotizing skin, soft‐tissue and pulmonary infections.

Case presentation: We describe a case of recurrent transmission of PVL‐producing ST5, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV MRSA (paediatric clone) from an asymptomatic nasal carrier to his family causing severe skin and soft‐tissue infections in the mother and children. Nasal application of mupirocin in the carrier was successful for prevention of new infections.

Conclusion: Recurrent skin infections are often not taken into account but may represent a serious threat if caused by a PVL‐producing MRSA strain. Family members of MRSA carriers are in danger of transmission. Characteristics of currently circulating CA‐MRSA strains require closer surveillance. Identification and decolonization of carriers is important to reduce the risk of spread into the community.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:02 Mar 2015 09:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:08
Publisher:Society for General Microbiology
ISSN:2053-3721
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1099/jmmcr.0.001859
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-109433

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