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Social skills: a resource for more social support, lower depression levels, higher quality of life, and participation in individuals with spinal cord injury?


Müller, Rachel; Peter, Claudio; Cieza, Alarcos; Post, Marcel W; Van Leeuwen, Christel M; Werner, Christina S; Geyh, Szilvia (2015). Social skills: a resource for more social support, lower depression levels, higher quality of life, and participation in individuals with spinal cord injury? Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(3):447-455.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relevance of social skills and their different dimensions (ie, expressivity, sensitivity, control) in relation to social support, depression, participation, and quality of life (QOL) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional data collection within the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Cohort.

SETTING

Community-based.

PARTICIPANTS

Individuals with SCI (N=503).

INTERVENTIONS

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Depression, participation, and QOL were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation, and 5 selected items of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale. The Social Skills Inventory and the Social Support Questionnaire were used to assess social skills (expressivity, sensitivity, control) and social support, respectively.

RESULTS

Structural equation modeling was conducted. In model 1 (χ(2)=27.81; df=19; P=.087; root mean square error of approximation=.033; 90% confidence interval=.000-.052), social skills as a latent variable was related to social support (β=.31; R(2)=.10), depression (β=-.31; total R(2)=.42), and QOL (β=.46; R(2)=.25). Social support partially mediated the effect of social skills on QOL (indirect effect: β=.04; P=.02) but not on depression or participation. In model 2 (χ(2)=27.96; df=19; P=.084; root mean square error of approximation=.031; 90% confidence interval=.000-.053), the social skills dimension expressivity showed a path coefficient of β=.20 to social support and β=.18 to QOL. Sensitivity showed a negative path coefficient to QOL (β=-.15) and control a path coefficient of β=-.15 to depression and β=.24 to QOL.

CONCLUSIONS

Social skills are a resource related to more social support, lower depression scores, and higher QOL.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relevance of social skills and their different dimensions (ie, expressivity, sensitivity, control) in relation to social support, depression, participation, and quality of life (QOL) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional data collection within the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Cohort.

SETTING

Community-based.

PARTICIPANTS

Individuals with SCI (N=503).

INTERVENTIONS

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Depression, participation, and QOL were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation, and 5 selected items of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale. The Social Skills Inventory and the Social Support Questionnaire were used to assess social skills (expressivity, sensitivity, control) and social support, respectively.

RESULTS

Structural equation modeling was conducted. In model 1 (χ(2)=27.81; df=19; P=.087; root mean square error of approximation=.033; 90% confidence interval=.000-.052), social skills as a latent variable was related to social support (β=.31; R(2)=.10), depression (β=-.31; total R(2)=.42), and QOL (β=.46; R(2)=.25). Social support partially mediated the effect of social skills on QOL (indirect effect: β=.04; P=.02) but not on depression or participation. In model 2 (χ(2)=27.96; df=19; P=.084; root mean square error of approximation=.031; 90% confidence interval=.000-.053), the social skills dimension expressivity showed a path coefficient of β=.20 to social support and β=.18 to QOL. Sensitivity showed a negative path coefficient to QOL (β=-.15) and control a path coefficient of β=-.15 to depression and β=.24 to QOL.

CONCLUSIONS

Social skills are a resource related to more social support, lower depression scores, and higher QOL.

Citations

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Additional indexing

Contributors:SwiSCI Study Group
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:28 September 2015
Deposited On:04 Mar 2015 10:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:09
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-9993
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2014.09.006
PubMed ID:25264110

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