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Kidney-synthesized erythropoietin is the main source for the hypoxia-induced increase in plasma erythropoietin in adult humans


Lundby, Anne-Kristine Meinild; Keiser, Stefanie; Siebenmann, Christoph; Schäffer, Leonhard; Lundby, Carsten (2014). Kidney-synthesized erythropoietin is the main source for the hypoxia-induced increase in plasma erythropoietin in adult humans. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 114(6):1107-1111.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Erythropoietin (EPO) is mainly synthesized within renal peritubular fibroblasts, and also other tissues such as the liver possess the ability. However, to what extent non-kidney produced EPO contributes to the hypoxia-induced increase in circulating EPO in adult humans remains unclear.

METHODS

We aimed to quantify this by assessing the distribution of EPO glycoforms which are characterized by posttranslational glycosylation patterns specific to the synthesizing cell. The analysis was performed on samples obtained in seven healthy volunteers before, during and after 1 month of sojourn at 3,454 m altitude.

RESULTS

Umbilical cord (UC) plasma served as control. As expected a peak (p < 0.05) in urine (2.3 ± 0.5-fold) and plasma (3.3 ± 0.5-fold) EPO was observed on day 1 of high-altitude exposure, and thereafter the concentration decreased for the urine sample obtained after 26 days at altitude, but remained elevated (p < 0.05) by 1.5 ± 0.2-fold above the initial sea level value for the plasma sample. The EPO glycoform heterogeneity, in the urine samples collected at altitude, did not differ from values at sea level, but were markedly lower (p < 0.05) than the mean percent migrated isoform (PMI) for the umbilical cord samples.

CONCLUSION

Our studies demonstrate (1) UC samples express a different glycoform distribution as compared to adult humans and hence illustrates the ability to synthesis EPO in non-kidney cells during fetal development (2) as expected hypoxia augments circulating EPO in adults and the predominant source here for remains being kidney derived.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Erythropoietin (EPO) is mainly synthesized within renal peritubular fibroblasts, and also other tissues such as the liver possess the ability. However, to what extent non-kidney produced EPO contributes to the hypoxia-induced increase in circulating EPO in adult humans remains unclear.

METHODS

We aimed to quantify this by assessing the distribution of EPO glycoforms which are characterized by posttranslational glycosylation patterns specific to the synthesizing cell. The analysis was performed on samples obtained in seven healthy volunteers before, during and after 1 month of sojourn at 3,454 m altitude.

RESULTS

Umbilical cord (UC) plasma served as control. As expected a peak (p < 0.05) in urine (2.3 ± 0.5-fold) and plasma (3.3 ± 0.5-fold) EPO was observed on day 1 of high-altitude exposure, and thereafter the concentration decreased for the urine sample obtained after 26 days at altitude, but remained elevated (p < 0.05) by 1.5 ± 0.2-fold above the initial sea level value for the plasma sample. The EPO glycoform heterogeneity, in the urine samples collected at altitude, did not differ from values at sea level, but were markedly lower (p < 0.05) than the mean percent migrated isoform (PMI) for the umbilical cord samples.

CONCLUSION

Our studies demonstrate (1) UC samples express a different glycoform distribution as compared to adult humans and hence illustrates the ability to synthesis EPO in non-kidney cells during fetal development (2) as expected hypoxia augments circulating EPO in adults and the predominant source here for remains being kidney derived.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2014
Deposited On:06 Mar 2015 07:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:09
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1439-6319
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-014-2844-7
PubMed ID:24531592

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