UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Topical photodynamic therapy in the treatment of actinic keratoses and Bowen's disease in transplant recipients


Dragieva, Galya; Hafner, Jürg; Dummer, Reinhard; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Roos, Malgorzata; Prinz, Bettina M; Burg, Günter; Binswanger, Ulrich; Kempf, Werner (2004). Topical photodynamic therapy in the treatment of actinic keratoses and Bowen's disease in transplant recipients. Transplantation, 77(1):115-121.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Transplant recipients (TR) have a dramatically increased risk for widespread epithelial neoplasms of the skin. Thus, there is a need to treat initial stages of these neoplasms such as actinic keratoses (AK) and Bowen's disease (BD) to prevent progression to invasive and potentially fatal squamous cell carcinoma. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proven to be an effective treatment for AK and BD in immunocompetent patients, but no prospective trials in immunocompromised TR have been performed so far.
METHODS: Twenty TR and 20 controls with histologically confirmed AK or BD underwent either a single or two consecutive treatments of topical PDT in an open trial. The application of 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) for 5 hours was followed by illumination with 75 J/cm2 of visible light delivered at 80 mW/cm2 by an incoherent light source.
RESULTS: The overall complete response rates in TR at 4, 12, and 48 weeks were 0.86, 0.68, and 0.48, respectively. The cure rates in both patient groups were comparable at 4 weeks but were significantly lower in TR than in controls at 12 and 48 weeks (P<0.05). Side effects included erythema, edema, and crust formation after illumination. Cosmetic results were excellent without scar formation or alterations in pigmentation.
CONCLUSIONS: Topical PDT with 20% 5-ALA is an effective and safe treatment for AK and BD in immunosuppressed TR, with initial response rates comparable with those in immunocompetent patients. It is particularly useful in TR because of the possibility for repeated treatment of large lesional areas.

BACKGROUND: Transplant recipients (TR) have a dramatically increased risk for widespread epithelial neoplasms of the skin. Thus, there is a need to treat initial stages of these neoplasms such as actinic keratoses (AK) and Bowen's disease (BD) to prevent progression to invasive and potentially fatal squamous cell carcinoma. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proven to be an effective treatment for AK and BD in immunocompetent patients, but no prospective trials in immunocompromised TR have been performed so far.
METHODS: Twenty TR and 20 controls with histologically confirmed AK or BD underwent either a single or two consecutive treatments of topical PDT in an open trial. The application of 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) for 5 hours was followed by illumination with 75 J/cm2 of visible light delivered at 80 mW/cm2 by an incoherent light source.
RESULTS: The overall complete response rates in TR at 4, 12, and 48 weeks were 0.86, 0.68, and 0.48, respectively. The cure rates in both patient groups were comparable at 4 weeks but were significantly lower in TR than in controls at 12 and 48 weeks (P<0.05). Side effects included erythema, edema, and crust formation after illumination. Cosmetic results were excellent without scar formation or alterations in pigmentation.
CONCLUSIONS: Topical PDT with 20% 5-ALA is an effective and safe treatment for AK and BD in immunosuppressed TR, with initial response rates comparable with those in immunocompetent patients. It is particularly useful in TR because of the possibility for repeated treatment of large lesional areas.

Citations

85 citations in Web of Science®
70 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 January 2004
Deposited On:11 Mar 2015 16:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:10
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0041-1337
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/01.TP.0000107284.04969.5C
PubMed ID:14724445

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations