UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Die "Lichtfäule" in Gruben und Bergwerken – ein historischer Rückblick


Brandl, H (2008). Die "Lichtfäule" in Gruben und Bergwerken – ein historischer Rückblick. Der Tintling, 13(3):51-56.

Abstract

Das Phänomen der "Lichtfäule", d.h. die Emission von Licht aus faulem, mit Pilzen befallenem Holz, ist weit verbreitet. Dieses Schauspiel ist aber heute in unseren Wäldern wegen der zunehmenden "Lichtverschmutzung" eher selten zu erkennen. Es ist deshalb nicht verwunderlich, dass leuchtendes Holz v.a. an ganz abgedunkelten Standorten (in Gruben und Bergwerken) beobachtet worden ist. Erste Belege reichen ins Jahr 1796 zurück.

Das Phänomen der "Lichtfäule", d.h. die Emission von Licht aus faulem, mit Pilzen befallenem Holz, ist weit verbreitet. Dieses Schauspiel ist aber heute in unseren Wäldern wegen der zunehmenden "Lichtverschmutzung" eher selten zu erkennen. Es ist deshalb nicht verwunderlich, dass leuchtendes Holz v.a. an ganz abgedunkelten Standorten (in Gruben und Bergwerken) beobachtet worden ist. Erste Belege reichen ins Jahr 1796 zurück.

Downloads

68 downloads since deposited on 22 Jan 2009
27 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:German
Date:2008
Deposited On:22 Jan 2009 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:52
Publisher:Montag
ISSN:1430-595X
Related URLs:http://www.tintling.com/ (Publisher)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-10985

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 6MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations