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Strategic control of gastrointestinal nematodes in grazing sheep with a long-acting moxidectin formulation


Balmer, Nicole; Torgerson, Paul R; Hertzberg, Hubertus (2015). Strategic control of gastrointestinal nematodes in grazing sheep with a long-acting moxidectin formulation. Small Ruminant Research, 126:80-89.

Abstract

A field study was undertaken on three Swiss sheep farms (A, B, C) to evaluate the efficacy of a long-acting moxidectin formulation (Cydectin® 2% LA) against gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN). Naturally infected ewes (all three farms) and their winter-borne lambs (farms A and B) were allocated to two groups (MOX, CON). At day 0 ewes of the MOX-groups were treated with 1mg moxidectin s.c. CON- and MOX-groups were grazed on separate pastures and were sampled for faeces and blood at 28-day intervals. Based on larval cultures Haemonchus contortus was the dominant GIN-species in ewes throughout the season. Over the entire observation period faecal egg count (FEC) of the MOX-ewes in farms A, B, C was 56, 84 and 87% less than the CON-ewes (p<0.05). FEC of lambs grazing with MOX-ewes was reduced in farms A and B by 56% and 61%, respectively (p<0.05), compared with the respective CON-groups. None of these lambs received anthelmintic treatment during the experiment. Therefore, the differences were due to an indirect effect mediated by the lower pasture contamination with GIN-larvae. These were reduced by 73, 81 and 74% in farms A-C respectively compared to the CON-groups (p<0.05). In farm B, where lambs remained with their mothers during the entire grazing season, these differences were also reflected by a higher daily weight gain (p<0.05) and reduced pepsinogen levels in lambs of treated ewes. This strategy offers an interesting potential for expanding refugia by propagation of GIN in untreated lambs.

A field study was undertaken on three Swiss sheep farms (A, B, C) to evaluate the efficacy of a long-acting moxidectin formulation (Cydectin® 2% LA) against gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN). Naturally infected ewes (all three farms) and their winter-borne lambs (farms A and B) were allocated to two groups (MOX, CON). At day 0 ewes of the MOX-groups were treated with 1mg moxidectin s.c. CON- and MOX-groups were grazed on separate pastures and were sampled for faeces and blood at 28-day intervals. Based on larval cultures Haemonchus contortus was the dominant GIN-species in ewes throughout the season. Over the entire observation period faecal egg count (FEC) of the MOX-ewes in farms A, B, C was 56, 84 and 87% less than the CON-ewes (p<0.05). FEC of lambs grazing with MOX-ewes was reduced in farms A and B by 56% and 61%, respectively (p<0.05), compared with the respective CON-groups. None of these lambs received anthelmintic treatment during the experiment. Therefore, the differences were due to an indirect effect mediated by the lower pasture contamination with GIN-larvae. These were reduced by 73, 81 and 74% in farms A-C respectively compared to the CON-groups (p<0.05). In farm B, where lambs remained with their mothers during the entire grazing season, these differences were also reflected by a higher daily weight gain (p<0.05) and reduced pepsinogen levels in lambs of treated ewes. This strategy offers an interesting potential for expanding refugia by propagation of GIN in untreated lambs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:27 Mar 2015 14:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:11
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0921-4488
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.smallrumres.2015.03.012
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-110041

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