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Extracellular proteases and their inhibitors in genetic diseases of the central nervous system.


Molinari, F; Meskanaite, Virginia; Munnich, A; Sonderegger, P; Colleaux, L (2003). Extracellular proteases and their inhibitors in genetic diseases of the central nervous system. Human Molecular Genetics, 12(S2):R195-R200.

Abstract

Cumulative evidence has shown that a delicate balance between serine proteases and their inhibitors is crucial for normal functioning of several biological pathways. The importance of proteases and their inhibitors is well documented in several human diseases. Among them, the best documented are hemophilia B, a genetic deficiency of the serine protease coagulation factor IX and serpinophathies. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (MIM 107400), is associated with early-onset emphysema and liver disease, while hereditary angioedema (HANE; MIM 106100) is caused by mutations in the C1 inhibitor, a serpin involved in the regulation of the complement cascade. Recently, two human genetic diseases of the central nervous system have been related to mutations in components of extracellular proteolytic systems. Here, we review the recent advances in this field.

Cumulative evidence has shown that a delicate balance between serine proteases and their inhibitors is crucial for normal functioning of several biological pathways. The importance of proteases and their inhibitors is well documented in several human diseases. Among them, the best documented are hemophilia B, a genetic deficiency of the serine protease coagulation factor IX and serpinophathies. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (MIM 107400), is associated with early-onset emphysema and liver disease, while hereditary angioedema (HANE; MIM 106100) is caused by mutations in the C1 inhibitor, a serpin involved in the regulation of the complement cascade. Recently, two human genetic diseases of the central nervous system have been related to mutations in components of extracellular proteolytic systems. Here, we review the recent advances in this field.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:15 October 2003
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:17
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0964-6906
Publisher DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddg276
PubMed ID:12925575
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1103

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