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In vivo viability of Echinococcus multilocularis eggs in a rodent model after different thermo-treatments


Federer, Karin; Armua-Fernandez, Maria Teresa; Hoby, Stefan; Wenker, Christian; Deplazes, Peter (2015). In vivo viability of Echinococcus multilocularis eggs in a rodent model after different thermo-treatments. Experimental Parasitology:14-19.

Abstract

Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis, a serious and emerging zoonotic disease in many parts of the northern hemisphere. Humans but also primates and other accidental hosts can acquire the infection by the ingestion of eggs excreted by the carnivore definitive hosts, e.g. after hand contact with egg-contaminated environments or by consumption of contaminated food or beverages. The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive in vivo method to determine the viability of E. multilocularis eggs and to establish suitable conditions (optimal temperature, exposure time and humidity) for their (prophylactic) inactivation. The sensitivity of a rodent model was evaluated and, conclusively, C57Bl/6 mice were most susceptible to subcutaneous inoculation of small numbers of sodium hypochlorite-resistant oncospheres, even more than to oral inoculation of mature eggs. In the second part of the study, various combinations of exposure temperature (between 45 °C and 80 °C), times (between 30 min and 180 min) and relative humidity (70% vs. suspended in water) were tested. After heat treatment in an incubator, the sodium hypochlorite resistance test was used to assess in vitro egg viability at the time of inoculation. Subsequently, the infectivity of the oncospheres was evaluatedby subcutaneous inoculation in mice. Eggs exposed to increasing temperatures were more resistant to heat if suspended in water as compared to eggs exposed on a filter paper at 70% relative humidity. As survival of eggs in water droplets on the vegetables cannot be excluded, further experiments were performed with eggs suspended in water only. Eggs were infectious after heat exposure at 65 °C for up to 120 min, however, no echinococcosis developed after treatment of the eggs at 65 °C for 180 min or at 70, 75 and 80 °C for 7.5, 15 or 30 min.

Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis, a serious and emerging zoonotic disease in many parts of the northern hemisphere. Humans but also primates and other accidental hosts can acquire the infection by the ingestion of eggs excreted by the carnivore definitive hosts, e.g. after hand contact with egg-contaminated environments or by consumption of contaminated food or beverages. The goal of this study was to develop a sensitive in vivo method to determine the viability of E. multilocularis eggs and to establish suitable conditions (optimal temperature, exposure time and humidity) for their (prophylactic) inactivation. The sensitivity of a rodent model was evaluated and, conclusively, C57Bl/6 mice were most susceptible to subcutaneous inoculation of small numbers of sodium hypochlorite-resistant oncospheres, even more than to oral inoculation of mature eggs. In the second part of the study, various combinations of exposure temperature (between 45 °C and 80 °C), times (between 30 min and 180 min) and relative humidity (70% vs. suspended in water) were tested. After heat treatment in an incubator, the sodium hypochlorite resistance test was used to assess in vitro egg viability at the time of inoculation. Subsequently, the infectivity of the oncospheres was evaluatedby subcutaneous inoculation in mice. Eggs exposed to increasing temperatures were more resistant to heat if suspended in water as compared to eggs exposed on a filter paper at 70% relative humidity. As survival of eggs in water droplets on the vegetables cannot be excluded, further experiments were performed with eggs suspended in water only. Eggs were infectious after heat exposure at 65 °C for up to 120 min, however, no echinococcosis developed after treatment of the eggs at 65 °C for 180 min or at 70, 75 and 80 °C for 7.5, 15 or 30 min.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:English
Date:25 March 2015
Deposited On:29 Apr 2015 14:23
Last Modified:10 Nov 2016 14:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0014-4894
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exppara.2015.03.016
PubMed ID:25816971

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