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Future Image Acquisition Trends for PET/MRI


Boss, Andreas; Weiger, Markus; Wiesinger, Florian (2015). Future Image Acquisition Trends for PET/MRI. Seminars in Nuclear Medicine, 45(3):201-211.

Abstract

Hybrid PET/MRI scanners have become commercially available in the past years but are not yet widely distributed. The combination of a state-of-the-art PET with a state-of-the-art MRI scanner provides numerous potential advantages compared with the established PET/CT hybrid systems, namely, increased soft tissue contrast; functional information from MRI such as diffusion, perfusion, and blood oxygenation level-dependent techniques; true multiplanar data acquisition; and reduced radiation exposure. On the contrary, current PET/MRI technology is hampered by several shortcomings compared with PET/CT, the most important issues being how to use MR data for PET attenuation correction and the low sensitivity of MRI for small-scale pulmonary pathologies compared with high-resolution CT. Moreover, the optimal choice for hybrid PET/MRI acquisition protocols needs to be defined providing the highest possible degree of sensitivity and specificity within the constraints of the available measurement time. A multitude of new acquisition strategies of PET and MRI not only offer to overcome current obstacles of hybrid PET/MRI but also provide deeper insights into the pathophysiology of oncological, inflammatory, or degenerative diseases from the combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques.

Abstract

Hybrid PET/MRI scanners have become commercially available in the past years but are not yet widely distributed. The combination of a state-of-the-art PET with a state-of-the-art MRI scanner provides numerous potential advantages compared with the established PET/CT hybrid systems, namely, increased soft tissue contrast; functional information from MRI such as diffusion, perfusion, and blood oxygenation level-dependent techniques; true multiplanar data acquisition; and reduced radiation exposure. On the contrary, current PET/MRI technology is hampered by several shortcomings compared with PET/CT, the most important issues being how to use MR data for PET attenuation correction and the low sensitivity of MRI for small-scale pulmonary pathologies compared with high-resolution CT. Moreover, the optimal choice for hybrid PET/MRI acquisition protocols needs to be defined providing the highest possible degree of sensitivity and specificity within the constraints of the available measurement time. A multitude of new acquisition strategies of PET and MRI not only offer to overcome current obstacles of hybrid PET/MRI but also provide deeper insights into the pathophysiology of oncological, inflammatory, or degenerative diseases from the combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2015
Deposited On:29 Apr 2015 14:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0001-2998
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.semnuclmed.2014.12.002
PubMed ID:25841275

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