UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Dyadisches Coping und Partnerschaftszufriedenheit bei verschiedenen Liebesstilen


Gagliardi, Simona; Bodenmann, Guy; Heinrichs, Nina (2015). Dyadisches Coping und Partnerschaftszufriedenheit bei verschiedenen Liebesstilen. Zeitschrift für Familienforschung:105-121.

Abstract

Zusammenfassung:
In den letzten vierzig Jahren wurden viele Versuche unternommen, sich der Komplexität des Forschungsgegenstandes „Liebe“ anzunähern. Lee entwickelte 1973 ein Klassifikationssystem und unterschied sechs Liebesstile: Eros (die romantische Liebe), Ludus (die spielerische Liebe), Storge (die freundschaftliche Liebe), Mania (die besitzergreifende Liebe), Pragma (die pragmatische Liebe) und Agape (die altruistische Liebe). In dieser Studie wurde der Zusammenhang zwischen Liebesstilen und der gemeinsamen Stressbewältigung analysiert. 154 Paare wurden zu ihrer Partnerschaft befragt. Die Resultate zeigten, dass Eros am stärksten mit dem dyadischen Coping assoziiert ist und prädiktiv sowohl für das positive als
auch für das negative dyadische Coping ist. Bei den Männern erwies sich zudem Agape prädiktiv für das positive dyadische Coping und Pragma als Prädiktor für das negative dyadische Coping, während sich einzig bei den Frauen Ludus prädiktiv für das negative dyadische Coping und Pragma prädiktiv für das positive dyadische Coping erwies. Implikationen für die Beratung, Paartherapie und zukünftige Forschung werden diskutiert.

Schlagwörter: Partnerschaft, dyadisches Coping, Liebesstile, Partnerschaftszufriedenheit

Abstract:
In the last forty years, many attempts were made to approach the complexity of “love” as a research topic. In 1973, Lee developed a typology of six different love styles: Eros (passionate love), Ludus (game-playing love), Storge (friendship love), Pragma (logical, “shopping list” love), Mania (possessive, dependent love) and Agape (all-giving, selfless love). The present study examines the association between love styles and dyadic coping. 154 couples were assessed on a variety of relationship measures. Our findings indicated that Eros is most strongly associated with dyadic coping and predictive both for the positive and for the negative dyadic coping. For men Agape turned out to be predictive for the positive dyadic coping and Pragma appeared as a predictor for the negative dyadic coping. Only for women, Ludus proved to be predictive for negative dyadic coping and Pragma turned out to be predictive for positive dyadic coping. Implications for
counselling, couple therapy and future research are being discussed.

Key words: close relationship, dyadic coping, love styles, relationship satisfaction

Abstract

Zusammenfassung:
In den letzten vierzig Jahren wurden viele Versuche unternommen, sich der Komplexität des Forschungsgegenstandes „Liebe“ anzunähern. Lee entwickelte 1973 ein Klassifikationssystem und unterschied sechs Liebesstile: Eros (die romantische Liebe), Ludus (die spielerische Liebe), Storge (die freundschaftliche Liebe), Mania (die besitzergreifende Liebe), Pragma (die pragmatische Liebe) und Agape (die altruistische Liebe). In dieser Studie wurde der Zusammenhang zwischen Liebesstilen und der gemeinsamen Stressbewältigung analysiert. 154 Paare wurden zu ihrer Partnerschaft befragt. Die Resultate zeigten, dass Eros am stärksten mit dem dyadischen Coping assoziiert ist und prädiktiv sowohl für das positive als
auch für das negative dyadische Coping ist. Bei den Männern erwies sich zudem Agape prädiktiv für das positive dyadische Coping und Pragma als Prädiktor für das negative dyadische Coping, während sich einzig bei den Frauen Ludus prädiktiv für das negative dyadische Coping und Pragma prädiktiv für das positive dyadische Coping erwies. Implikationen für die Beratung, Paartherapie und zukünftige Forschung werden diskutiert.

Schlagwörter: Partnerschaft, dyadisches Coping, Liebesstile, Partnerschaftszufriedenheit

Abstract:
In the last forty years, many attempts were made to approach the complexity of “love” as a research topic. In 1973, Lee developed a typology of six different love styles: Eros (passionate love), Ludus (game-playing love), Storge (friendship love), Pragma (logical, “shopping list” love), Mania (possessive, dependent love) and Agape (all-giving, selfless love). The present study examines the association between love styles and dyadic coping. 154 couples were assessed on a variety of relationship measures. Our findings indicated that Eros is most strongly associated with dyadic coping and predictive both for the positive and for the negative dyadic coping. For men Agape turned out to be predictive for the positive dyadic coping and Pragma appeared as a predictor for the negative dyadic coping. Only for women, Ludus proved to be predictive for negative dyadic coping and Pragma turned out to be predictive for positive dyadic coping. Implications for
counselling, couple therapy and future research are being discussed.

Key words: close relationship, dyadic coping, love styles, relationship satisfaction

Downloads

7 downloads since deposited on 30 Apr 2015
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:German
Date:2015
Deposited On:30 Apr 2015 06:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:14
Publisher:Barbara Budrich Verlag
ISSN:1437-2940
Related URLs:http://www.budrich-journals.de/index.php/zff/article/view/18589 (Publisher)

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 286kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations