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Academic achievement and satisfaction in adolescents with CHD


Schaefer, Christina J; Hoop, Ricarda; Schürch-Reith, Stefanie; Stambach, Dominik; Kretschmar, Oliver; Bauersfeld, Urs; Latal, Beatrice; Landolt, Markus A (2016). Academic achievement and satisfaction in adolescents with CHD. Cardiology in the Young, 26(02):257-262.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate academic achievement and satisfaction in adolescents with CHD. Study design Questionnaires were sent to all adolescents, aged between 17 and 20 years with CHD, currently treated at our hospital (n=326) in order to assess the patients' education and satisfaction with their academic career. Results were compared with the official community statistics.
RESULTS: A total of 207 patients completed the questionnaires (participation rate 63.5%), 113 boys and 94 girls; 50% had completed mandatory school at the highest, 37.3% at the middle, and 12.7% at the lowest educational level. The distribution in the general population was comparable: 57.6, 32.5, and 9.9%, respectively (p=0.8). Adolescents with severe CHD were less likely to attain a higher educational level than those with moderate or mild CHD (p=0.03 for school grades 7-9). None of the other examined medical or socio-demographic factors, such as socio-economic status, foreign language, severity of CHD, cyanosis, and open heart surgery, were found to be associated with lower educational attainment. After the mandatory 9 years of schooling, 21.4% (n=44) of the patients with CHD compared with 16.7% in the general population attended higher school levels heading towards university education (p=0.7). From the 165 patients who provided information on career satisfaction, 79% regarded their job or school situation as being their desired one without a difference for those with severe CHD.
CONCLUSION: School education in Swiss adolescents with CHD is very similar to the normal population. In addition, the majority of adolescents are satisfied with their educational career. This fact may be due to the good educational support provided during schooling.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate academic achievement and satisfaction in adolescents with CHD. Study design Questionnaires were sent to all adolescents, aged between 17 and 20 years with CHD, currently treated at our hospital (n=326) in order to assess the patients' education and satisfaction with their academic career. Results were compared with the official community statistics.
RESULTS: A total of 207 patients completed the questionnaires (participation rate 63.5%), 113 boys and 94 girls; 50% had completed mandatory school at the highest, 37.3% at the middle, and 12.7% at the lowest educational level. The distribution in the general population was comparable: 57.6, 32.5, and 9.9%, respectively (p=0.8). Adolescents with severe CHD were less likely to attain a higher educational level than those with moderate or mild CHD (p=0.03 for school grades 7-9). None of the other examined medical or socio-demographic factors, such as socio-economic status, foreign language, severity of CHD, cyanosis, and open heart surgery, were found to be associated with lower educational attainment. After the mandatory 9 years of schooling, 21.4% (n=44) of the patients with CHD compared with 16.7% in the general population attended higher school levels heading towards university education (p=0.7). From the 165 patients who provided information on career satisfaction, 79% regarded their job or school situation as being their desired one without a difference for those with severe CHD.
CONCLUSION: School education in Swiss adolescents with CHD is very similar to the normal population. In addition, the majority of adolescents are satisfied with their educational career. This fact may be due to the good educational support provided during schooling.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:06 May 2015 06:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:14
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1047-9511
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S1047951115000074
PubMed ID:25707984

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